Career Articles https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss Career Articles for One Aggie Network en Establishing a Professional Network https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/establishing-professional-network <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Establishing a Professional Network</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 04, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/people-shaking-hands-uc-davis.jpg?h=242cd5c8&amp;itok=1OT5Byx7" width="1280" height="720" alt="People shaking hands" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Networking is the process of cultivating relationships to obtain or provide information, resources and/or support.  Building and maintaining a professional network is essential to success in today’s job market. Establishing relationships through network connections can serve you well in determining your next job, career path and future. Here at the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association, we are here to help connect you to the extensive Aggie network across the globe. Whether you’re searching for your first job or an established professional, networking can assist with your career aspirations. Where do I start? Almost anyone can be a networking contact. Start by thinking about all of the people you may already know: family, friends, friends of friends, neighbors, former roommates, fellow alumni, professional associations, fellow job seekers, mentors, club associates, doctors, dentists, lawyers, accountants, insurance agents, real estate agents, bankers and all past associates. Networking is a lifelong investment in becoming a successful professional. Whatever direction your career takes, building and nurturing relationships will be essential. Invest time and energy in the people component of your career. Tips for Networking: Be fully present in your conversation and listen more than you talk. Think long term; not just what you think you want in the short term. Give more than you get, but do not over commit yourself. If you do commit to something, take action immediately. Be honest Only go to networking events that excite you Connect with a regional or special interest alumni network (hyperlink) Networking Guides How to introduce yourself How to network online "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Here at the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association, we are here to help connect you to the extensive Aggie network across the globe. Whether you’re searching for your first job or an established professional, networking can assist with your career aspirations. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><span><span>Networking is the process of cultivating relationships to obtain or provide information, resources and/or support.  Building and maintaining a professional network is essential to success in today’s job market.</span></span> <span><span>Establishing relationships through network connections can serve you well in determining your next job, career path and future. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Here at the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association, we are here to help connect you to the extensive Aggie network across the globe. Whether you’re searching for your first job or an established professional, networking can assist with your career aspirations.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Where do I start?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Almost anyone can be a networking contact. Start by thinking about all of the people you may already know: family, friends, friends of friends, neighbors, former roommates, fellow alumni, professional associations, fellow job seekers, mentors, club associates, doctors, dentists, lawyers, accountants, insurance agents, real estate agents, bankers and all past associates.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Networking is a lifelong investment in becoming a successful professional. Whatever direction your career takes, building and nurturing relationships will be essential. Invest time and energy in the people component of your career.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Tips for Networking:</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <ul class="list--arrow"><li><span><span><span><span><span>Be fully present in your conversation and listen more than you talk.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Think long term; not just what you think you want in the short term.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Give more than you get, but do not over commit yourself. If you do commit to something, take action immediately.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Be honest</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Only go to networking events that excite you</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Connect with a regional or special interest alumni network (hyperlink)</span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul><h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Networking Guides</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <ul class="list--arrow"><li><span><span><span><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/sites/g/files/dgvnsk2236/files/find/resources/networking/Networking-Pitch-Handout.pdf"><span><span>How to introduce yourself </span></span></a></span></span></span></li> <li><a href="http:// https://icc.ucdavis.edu/find/resources/networking/networking-online"><span><span><span>How to network online</span></span></span></a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/alumni-stories" hreflang="en">Alumni News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 04 Sep 2019 18:27:07 +0000 Anonymous 5296 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Acing the Job Interview https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/acing-job-interview <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Acing the Job Interview</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 03, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/20171016_studentcenter_007.jpg?h=242cd5c8&amp;itok=LWsVLZ4P" width="1280" height="720" alt="People talking to each other across a table" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Interviewing can be a stressful experience –– but it doesn’t have to be. With the right preparation tools, interviewing can be an insightful way to discover what job is right for you, whatever stage you are at in your career. These resources from the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association will prepare you for even the toughest interview questions. Whether you’re a seasoned professional or someone looking for your first career job, these materials below will help you land your first job, change career paths or get that promotion. Interviewing The interview is one of the most important phases of the job search process. It is your opportunity to convince an employer that you are the right person for the job. The goal of interviewing Communicate information about yourself, your experience, your skills and your abilities as they relate to the position Seek further information about the job and the organization Evaluate the match between your needs and what the job offers How to answer interview questions Think through possible questions that the interviewer might ask and practice your answers. Click here for samples of questions you can use to prep for an interview: Before your interview, research the company, job description and your industry. Incorporate your findings into your responses to questions in the interview, showing your experience in relation to the job, company, and industry. Use these tips from the Internship and Career Center to prepare. Show your experience through examples of previous work and project experience. Your goal is to show the employer how hiring you will tackle their obstacles. Questions to ask in an interview Have questions prepared for the end of the interview. Ask questions related to the position and company like: What are the top successes and challenges that previous employees have had in this role? What does a typical day look like in this role? Do not ask questions about salary or benefits. These questions should be saved for when an offer is made. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "These resources from the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association will prepare you for even the toughest interview questions. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><span><span>Interviewing can be a stressful experience –– but it doesn’t have to be. With the right preparation tools, interviewing can be an insightful way to discover what job is right for you, whatever stage you are at in your career.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>These resources from the </span></span><span><span><span><span>UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association </span></span></span></span><span><span>will prepare you for even the toughest interview questions. Whether you’re a seasoned professional or someone looking for your first career job, these materials below will help you land your first job, change career paths or get that promotion.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Interviewing</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span>The interview is one of the most important phases of the job search process. It is your opportunity to convince an employer that you are the right person for the job.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>The goal of interviewing</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span>Communicate information about yourself, your experience, your skills and your abilities as they relate to the position</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Seek further information about the job and the organization</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Evaluate the match between your needs and what the job offers</span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul><h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>How to answer interview questions</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Think through possible questions that the interviewer might ask and practice your answers. <strong><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/interview/questions">Click here for samples of questions</a></strong> you can use to prep for an interview:</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Before your interview, research the company, job description and your industry. Incorporate your findings into your responses to questions in the interview, showing your experience in relation to the job, company, and industry. <strong><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/interview/prepare">Use these tips</a></strong> from the Internship and Career Center to prepare.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Show your experience through examples of previous work and project experience. Your goal is to show the employer how hiring you will tackle their obstacles.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Questions to ask in an interview</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Have questions prepared for the end of the interview. Ask questions related to the position and company like:</span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul class="list--arrow"><li><span><span><span><span><span>What are the top successes and challenges that previous employees have had in this role?</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>What does a typical day look like in this role?</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Do not ask questions about salary or benefits. These questions should be saved for when an offer is made.</span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/alumni-stories" hreflang="en">Alumni News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 03 Sep 2019 22:29:52 +0000 Anonymous 5286 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Find the Right Job https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/find-right-job <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Find the Right Job</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 03, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/20171205_VSC_11.jpg?h=6f3285a6&amp;itok=-CSJKq8j" width="1280" height="720" alt="Two people looking at a piece of paper" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Achieving your career goals should include organizing a job search campaign, consisting of a combination of strategies -- from networking to job boards. Searching for a new job can be a daunting prospect for anyone. Securing the right position takes hard work, research, persistence and good instincts. Fortunately, the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association can assist you in your job search. And don’t forget to use that extensive Aggie network to help connect you to jobs in your field. Tips for the job search Assess your interests, abilities, and values. Then, align your job search with them. Establish your career path and goals. Then, use your goals to focus your job search. Update your resume and cover letter.  Research the companies and industries that interest you. Assess your online brand. Check your social media privacy settings and ensure your content is professional. Consider conducting information interviews and attend career fairs to learn about employers. Conduct targeted job searches on job boards and industry association websites. Keep records of all materials, job descriptions and interactions in relation to your job search. Use these materials to prepare for the interview.  For more ideas and resources check out the UC Davis Internship and Career Center’s job search resources. Check out Handshake. Avoid job phishing. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "These resources from the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association will prepare you for even the toughest interview questions. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><span><span>Achieving your career goals should include organizing a job search campaign, consisting of a combination of strategies -- from networking to job boards. Searching for a new job can be a daunting prospect for anyone. Securing the right position takes hard work, research, persistence and good instincts.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Fortunately, the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association can assist you in your job search. And don’t forget to use that extensive Aggie network to help connect you to jobs in your field.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Tips for the job search</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span>Assess your interests, abilities, and values. Then, align your job search with them.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Establish your career path and goals. Then, use your goals to focus your job search.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/how-stand-out-competitive-job-market">Update your resume and cover letter</a>. </span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Research the companies and industries that interest you.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Assess your online brand. Check your social media privacy settings and ensure your content is professional.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Consider conducting information interviews and attend career fairs to learn about employers.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Conduct targeted job searches on job boards and industry association websites.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Keep records of all materials, job descriptions and interactions in relation to your job search. Use these materials to prepare for the interview. </span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>For more ideas and resources check out the <a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/find">UC Davis Internship and Career Center’s job search resources</a>.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Check out <a href="https://ucdavis.joinhandshake.com/login">Handshake</a>.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/majors/blog/tips-trends/7-ways-safeguard-yourself-from-job-phishing-scams">Avoid job phishing</a>.</span></span></span></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/alumni-stories" hreflang="en">Alumni News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 03 Sep 2019 22:20:40 +0000 Anonymous 5281 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Professional Development Tips for Alumni https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/professional-development-tips-alumni <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Professional Development Tips for Alumni</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 03, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/20199212-design-hall-6062.jpg?h=242cd5c8&amp;itok=VtU7vdYg" width="1280" height="720" alt="A person presenting to a gropu" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Never Stop Learning “Lifelong learner” is a popularized term, but it is the correct approach to your career. Understanding your strengths and how to apply them, as well as knowing where you can improve is vital to career growth. Regardless of where you are in your career journey, it is never too late to learn new skills or update existing ones. The UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association is here to help. Below are some tips and tricks to get the most out of professional development courses. Professional development comes in all shapes and sizes. Start by reading articles in your industry or finding articles on how to improve your soft skills at work. Periodically, perform a career evaluation of your career plan. If you don’t have a plan, create one. Think about what you want to accomplish, then detail the steps, skills and jobs you would need to have to get there. Click here for a guide, courtesy of UC Davis. Know Yourself Career management begins with exploring who you are, what you want, where you want to go and knowing how you can get there. As the foundation of career management, self-assessment encourages you to identify and explore your values, personality, interests and skills. The more insight gained from self-assessment, the more informed and focused your career decisions will be. Additional Career Resources Learn About Yourself Explore Your Career Take Action Set Goals How to Be Happy at Work Explore Careers in Data Make a Lasting Impression Optimize Your LinkedIn "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Regardless of where you are in your career journey, it is never too late to learn new skills or update existing ones. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h4>Never Stop Learning</h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Lifelong learner” is a popularized term, but it is the correct approach to your career. Understanding your strengths and how to apply them, as well as knowing where you can improve is vital to career growth. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Regardless of where you are in your career journey, it is never too late to learn new skills or update existing ones. The UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association is here to help. Below are some tips and tricks to get the most out of professional development courses.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Professional development comes in all shapes and sizes. Start by reading articles in your industry or finding articles on how to improve your soft skills at work.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Periodically, perform a career evaluation of your career plan. If you don’t have a plan, create one. Think about what you want to accomplish, then detail the steps, skills and jobs you would need to have to get there. <a href="https://hr.ucdavis.edu/departments/learning-dev/toolkits/career-mgmt/next-steps">Click here for a guide</a>, courtesy of UC Davis. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Know Yourself</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Career management begins with exploring who you are, what you want, where you want to go and knowing how you can get there. As the foundation of career management, self-assessment encourages you to identify and explore your values, personality, interests and skills. The more insight gained from self-assessment, the more informed and focused your career decisions will be.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><span><span>Additional Career Resources</span></span></span></span></span></h4> <ul class="list--arrow"><li><a href="https://hr.ucdavis.edu/departments/learning-dev/toolkits/career-mgmt/assess">Learn About Yourself</a></li> <li><a href="https://hr.ucdavis.edu/departments/learning-dev/toolkits/career-mgmt/career-exploration">Explore Your Career</a></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://hr.ucdavis.edu/departments/learning-dev/toolkits/career-mgmt/action">T</a></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://hr.ucdavis.edu/departments/learning-dev/toolkits/career-mgmt/action"><span><span><span><span><span>ake Action</span></span></span></span></span></a></li> <li><a href="https://hr.ucdavis.edu/departments/learning-dev/toolkits/career-mgmt/next-steps/goals">Set Goals</a></li> <li><a href="https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/how-be-happy-work">How to Be Happy at Work</a></li> <li><a href="https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/data-careers">Explore Careers in Data</a></li> <li><a href="https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/janet-elsea-how-make-lasting-impression-your-field">Make a Lasting Impression</a></li> <li><a href="https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/8-tips-optimizing-your-linkedin">Optimize Your LinkedIn</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/alumni-stories" hreflang="en">Alumni News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 03 Sep 2019 22:00:04 +0000 Anonymous 5276 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu How to Stand Out in a Competitive Job Market https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/how-stand-out-competitive-job-market <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">How to Stand Out in a Competitive Job Market</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 03, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/students-at-table-uc-davis.jpg?h=242cd5c8&amp;itok=KYpkWmq_" width="1280" height="720" alt="People sitting around a table looking at a computer screen" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="A UC Davis alumni guide to writing your resume and cover letter In today’s competitive market, your resume and cover letter need to be a focused, concise summary of your qualifications, customized for the specific position for which you are applying. Your resume is a critical marketing tool that presents your accomplishments, strengths and experience to prospective employers. Your cover letter explains who you are, what your qualifications are and why an employer should want to spend valuable time meeting you in person. No matter if you are looking for your first job out of college or are an experienced job seeker, the resources below – courtesy of the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association – are here to help. And don’t forget about the amazing network of fellow Aggies within your chosen industry; they can help you learn about specific keywords to use on your resume and cover letter in order to stand out to recruiters. Tips for writing a great resume or CV Curriculum Vitae (CV) or Resume, what is right for you? Click here for a great description of each option. A well-written resume highlighting your most relevant qualifications for the job will help you get selected for an interview. Above all, your resume needs to be consistent, concise and easy to read. You should tailor your resume or CV to show you are a good fit for the position. You will need to clearly understand the mission, focus, goals and objectives of the organization and job that you are applying to. Research is key. Follow these three steps for success from the UC Davis Internship and Career Center: Brainstorm and Collect Experiences/Skills Tailor and Format Submit Tips for writing a great cover letter The cover letter acts as your introduction to a prospective employer. Highlight your enthusiasm for the position and clearly explain why your previous job, internship, and/or skills are a good fit for the employer. You should always include a cover letter with your application unless specifically told not to by the employer. Include: your contact information the date a greeting  a few paragraphs highlight qualifications and examples a summary of qualifications For more do’s and don’ts of cover letter writing check out the UC Davis Internship and Career Center’s tips here. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "In today’s competitive market, an effective resume and cover letter needs to be a focused, concise summary of your qualifications, customized for the specific position for which you are applying. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h3>A UC Davis alumni guide to writing your resume and cover letter</h3> <p><span><span><span><span><span>In today’s competitive market, your resume and cover letter need to be a focused, concise summary of your qualifications, customized for the specific position for which you are applying. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><em>Your resume</em> is a critical marketing tool that presents your accomplishments, strengths and experience to prospective employers. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><em>Your cover letter</em> explains who you are, what your qualifications are and why an employer should want to spend valuable time meeting you in person.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>No matter if you are looking for your first job out of college or are an experienced job seeker, the resources below – courtesy of the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association – are here to help. And don’t forget about the amazing network of fellow Aggies within your chosen industry; they can help you learn about specific keywords to use on your resume and cover letter in order to stand out to recruiters.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Tips for writing a great resume or CV</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Curriculum Vitae (CV) or Resume, what is right for you? <a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/materials/resume/resumecv">Click here for a great description</a> of each option.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>A well-written resume highlighting your most relevant qualifications for the job will help you get selected for an interview. Above all, your resume needs to be consistent, concise and easy to read.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>You should tailor your resume or CV to show you are a good fit for the position. You will need to clearly understand the mission, focus, goals and objectives of the organization and job that you are applying to. Research is key. Follow these three steps for success from the UC Davis Internship and Career Center:</span></span></span></span></span></p> <ol><li><span><span><span><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/materials/resume/step1"><span><span>Brainstorm and Collect Experiences/Skills</span></span></a></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/materials/resume/step2"><span><span>Tailor and Format</span></span></a></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/materials/resume/step3"><span><span>Submit</span></span></a></span></span></span></li> </ol><h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Tips for writing a great cover letter</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span>The cover letter acts as your introduction to a prospective employer. Highlight your enthusiasm for the position and clearly explain why your previous job, internship, and/or skills are a good fit for the employer. You should always include a cover letter with your application unless specifically told not to by the employer.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Include:</span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul class="list--arrow"><li><span><span><span><span><span>your contact information</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>the date</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>a greeting </span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>a few paragraphs highlight qualifications and examples </span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>a summary of qualifications</span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul><p><span><span><span><span><span>For more do’s and don’ts of cover letter writing check out the <a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/materials/cover-letters">UC Davis Internship and Career Center’s tips here.</a></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/alumni-stories" hreflang="en">Alumni News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 03 Sep 2019 18:57:35 +0000 Anonymous 5271 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu What to Expect in a Second Interview https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/what-expect-second-interview <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">What to Expect in a Second Interview</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">August 23, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/interview2.png?h=d09b6c17&amp;itok=Mvp2pIBz" width="1280" height="720" alt="An illustration of four people sitting at at table with one person facing them. " typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="By Robin Reshwan  Raise your hand if you remember Shalamar&#039;s &#039;70s hit &quot;The Second Time Around.&quot; According to the lyrics, when it comes to romantic love, &quot;the second time is so much better, baby.&quot; The same can be said of job interviews, too. Modern companies should use multiple rounds of interviews in the hiring process, according to Power Moves, a book by psychologist Adam Grant, professor at the Wharton School at University of Pennsylvania. Second interviews help hiring managers discern whether job seekers are genuinely qualified instead of simply well-rehearsed. Candidates with fake or hyperbolic answers will likely have a difficult time maintaining that façade over the course of several conversations. To provide a 360-degree view of an applicant, second interview questions may differ in topic and style from those asked during first interviews. Preparing for probing second interview questions will help you understand what to expect in a second interview. Read on for tips on how to succeed when you move to round two. To prepare for second interview questions: Be yourself in the interview process. Dive deep with your answers. Communicate your value. I recently heard an exceptionally wise tip from a professional contact: &quot;Show how you can be a culture add.&quot; For years, people have advised candidates to make sure they can fit in with the company culture. But this outstanding candidate threw down the gauntlet by showing how the culture would be even better if he joined the team. In your second interview, make sure you clearly communicate how your unique skills, personality and experiences can improve the organization. In doing so, you are demonstrating your understanding of where the company is today and you are committing to add value with your unique contributions. It is not an easy order to fill, but it&#039;s a worthwhile approach to consider and a huge plus when you succeed. When it comes to interviews, a &quot;one and done&quot; approach simply doesn&#039;t provide enough information for either party to make the best decision. But multiple meetings don&#039;t have to only serve the needs of the company. The second interview gives discerning candidates excellent opportunities to differentiate themselves and vet companies to ensure a good fit. With both parties seeking to make the most of their time together, it increases the odds of making an ideal match. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "By Robin Reshwan  Raise your hand if you remember Shalamar&#039;s &#039;70s hit &quot;The Second Time Around.&quot; According to the lyrics, when it comes to romantic love, &quot;the second time is so much better, baby.&quot; The same can be said of job interviews, too." } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h5><em>By Robin Reshwan </em></h5> <p>Raise your hand if you remember Shalamar's '70s hit "The Second Time Around." According to the lyrics, when it comes to romantic love, "the second time is so much better, baby."</p> <p>The same can be said of job interviews, too.</p> <p>Modern companies should use multiple rounds of interviews in the hiring process, according to Power Moves, a book by psychologist Adam Grant, professor at the Wharton School at University of Pennsylvania. Second interviews help hiring managers discern whether job seekers are genuinely qualified instead of simply well-rehearsed. Candidates with fake or hyperbolic answers will likely have a difficult time maintaining that façade over the course of several conversations.</p> <p>To provide a 360-degree view of an applicant, second interview questions may differ in topic and style from those asked during first interviews. Preparing for probing second interview questions will help you understand what to expect in a second interview.<br /> Read on for tips on how to succeed when you move to round two.</p> <p>To prepare for second interview questions:</p> <ul class="list--arrow"><li>Be yourself in the interview process.</li> <li>Dive deep with your answers.</li> <li>Communicate your value.</li> </ul><p>I recently heard an exceptionally wise tip from a professional contact: "Show how you can be a culture add." For years, people have advised candidates to make sure they can fit in with the company culture. But this outstanding candidate threw down the gauntlet by showing how the culture would be even better if he joined the team.</p> <p>In your second interview, make sure you clearly communicate how your unique skills, personality and experiences can improve the organization. In doing so, you are demonstrating your understanding of where the company is today and you are committing to add value with your unique contributions. It is not an easy order to fill, but it's a worthwhile approach to consider and a huge plus when you succeed.</p> <p>When it comes to interviews, a "one and done" approach simply doesn't provide enough information for either party to make the best decision. But multiple meetings don't have to only serve the needs of the company. The second interview gives discerning candidates excellent opportunities to differentiate themselves and vet companies to ensure a good fit. With both parties seeking to make the most of their time together, it increases the odds of making an ideal match.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/parent-news" hreflang="en">Parent News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 23 Aug 2019 22:46:17 +0000 Anonymous 5221 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu How to Be Happy at Work https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/how-be-happy-work <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">How to Be Happy at Work</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">May 22, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/happy%20at%20work%202.jpg?h=3f7cf8c9&amp;itok=QjdVYjIx" width="1280" height="720" alt="How to Be Happy at Work" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Written by Robin Reshwan Think fulfilling careers require your employer to offer free food, massages and pay better than the market? Think again. You don&#039;t need to work for a unicorn tech company to find happiness at work. Research shows that true professional satisfaction stems at least partially from factors within your individual control. Read on to learn about three things you can do today to increase your joy in your job.  Think about the big picture. Being intentional is essential to achieving goals and feeling satisfied about your accomplishments. Part of being intentional means taking a big-picture view of daily tasks and responsibilities. Doing so can boost happiness at work by underscoring their value and putting the time they require into perspective, according to research by psychology and marketing professors Jennifer Aaker, Cassie Mogilner Holmes and Hal Hershfield. They write that &quot;this elevated perspective involves optimizing one&#039;s weeks, rather than any given moment.&quot;With a larger purpose in mind, you can turn convert tasks from mundane to meaningful. You may already have productivity goals created with your manager, but you should strive to set one or two each month, quarter or year that are exclusively for your own development, then look for ways to reach them through your daily work. Maybe you want to strengthen your public speaking skills. With that in mind, the short departmental update you have to give every week can turn into an opportunity to get closer to your goal by engaging your audience and shifting co-workers&#039; perspectives of your value. Look for opportunities to learn. Lifelong learning is beneficial for your career. Its value extends to employees and also to their organizations, which reap the benefits of a better-educated and better-trained workforce. Additionally, using your brain to grow and learn raises your engagement at work. Only 32 percent of employees are very satisfied with the commitment their organizations demonstrate toward professional development opportunities, according to a 2017 survey conducted by the Society for Human Resources Management. Luckily, your employer does not have to be the gateway to your professional development. You can take matters into your own hands to get the same (or even better, customized) results. Learning doesn&#039;t have to be expensive or consume a lot of time. It can be as simple as trying out different tools or seeking new environments. You can sign up for online courses, listen to podcasts, participate in webinars or attend professional association conferences. Consider taking a tutorial class to learn an advanced feature of any of the technology or productivity tools you use at work. In short, you have control over your knowledge. Look for opportunities to strengthen it regularly. Connect with a community. Getting outside perspectives and having others to learn from are critically important to building fulfilling careers. Yet according to the 2019 Marketer Happiness Report, &quot;Only a quarter of us are meeting regularly with others outside of our own companies to exchange ideas. We&#039;re often trapped in our own bubbles or echo chambers.&quot; Seeking and building a community can be very simple. Find others in your profession who work outside of your team, then follow them on social media, schedule phone calls or attend events with them. If you aren&#039;t doing this at all, start by doing it once a year. Or you can increase the interaction frequency to quarterly, monthly or even weekly depending on your needs and goals. The effort is small, but the benefits are enormous. Alleviating your feelings of being unhappy at work does not have to be a difficult, expensive or time-consuming process. Start with a big-picture plan, layer in learning and lean into your community. That will put you on your way to increased professional satisfaction. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Written by Robin Reshwan Think fulfilling careers require your employer to offer free food, massages and pay better than the market? Think again. You don&#039;t need to work for a unicorn tech company to find happiness at work. Research shows that true professional satisfaction stems at least partially from factors within your individual control." } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span>Written by Robin Reshwan </span></span></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText"><span><span>Think fulfilling careers require your employer to offer free food, massages a<a href="https://money.usnews.com/careers/salaries-and-benefits/articles/where-is-the-wage-growth"><span><span>nd pay better than the market</span></span></a>? Think again. You don't need to work for a unicorn tech company to find happiness at work. Research shows that true professional satisfaction stems at least partially from factors within your individual control.</span></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText"><span><span>Read on to learn about three things you can do today to increase your joy in your job. </span></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText"><strong><span><span><span><span>Think about the big picture.</span></span></span></span></strong></p> <p class="MsoBodyText"><span><span>Being intentional is essential to achieving goals and feeling satisfied about your accomplishments. Part of being intentional means taking a big-picture view of daily tasks and responsibilities. Doing so can boost happiness at work by underscoring their value and putting the time they require <span>into</span> perspective, according to research by psychology and marketing professors Jennifer Aaker, Cassie Mogilner Holmes and Hal Hershfield. They write that "this elevated perspective involves optimizing one's weeks, rather than any given moment."</span></span><br /><span><span>With a larger purpose in mind, you can turn convert tasks from mundane to meaningful. You may already have productivity goals created with your manager, but you should strive to set one or two each month, quarter or year that are exclusively for your own development, then look for ways to reach them through your daily work.</span></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText"><span><span>Maybe you want to strengthen your public speaking skills. With that in mind, the short departmental update you have to give every week can turn into an opportunity to get closer to your goal by engaging your audience and <a href="https://money.usnews.com/careers/company-culture/articles/strategies-for-getting-clients-and-co-workers-to-take-me-seriously"><span><span>shifting</span></span></a> <a href="https://money.usnews.com/careers/company-culture/articles/strategies-for-getting-clients-and-co-workers-to-take-me-seriously"><span><span>co-workers' perspectives of your value</span></span></a>.</span></span></p> <p><strong><span><span><span><span>Look for opportunities to learn.</span></span></span></span></strong></p> <p class="MsoBodyText"><span><span><a href="https://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/articles/2017-03-13/how-to-find-professional-success-through-lifelong-learning"><span><span>Lifelong learning is beneficial </span></span></a>for your career. Its value extends to employees and also to their organizations, which reap the benefits of a better-educated and better-trained workforce. Additionally, using your brain to grow and learn raises your engagement at work.</span></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText"><span><span>Only 32 percent of employees are very satisfied with the commitment their organizations demonstrate toward professional development opportunities, according to a 2017 survey conducted by the Society for Human Resources Management. Luckily, your employer does not have to be the gateway to your professional development. You can take matters into your own hands to get the same (or even better, customized) results.</span></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText"><span><span>Learning doesn't have to be expensive or consume a lot of time. It can be as simple as trying out different tools or seeking new environments. You can sign up for online courses, listen to podcasts, participate in webinars or attend<a href="https://money.usnews.com/careers/company-culture/articles/2018-09-05/the-perks-of-professional-organizations"><span><span> professional association conferences</span></span></a>. Consider taking a tutorial class to learn an advanced feature of any of the technology or productivity tools you use at work.</span></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText"><span><span>In short, you have control over your knowledge. Look for opportunities to strengthen it regularly.</span></span></p> <p><strong><span><span><span><span>Connect with a community.</span></span></span></span></strong></p> <p class="MsoBodyText"><span><span>Getting outside perspectives and having others to learn from are critically important to building fulfilling careers. Yet according to the 2019 Marketer Happiness Report, "Only a quarter of us are meeting regularly with others outside of our own companies to exchange ideas. We're often trapped in our own bubbles or echo chambers."</span></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText"><span><span>Seeking and building a community can be very simple. Find others in your profession <a href="https://money.usnews.com/careers/company-culture/slideshows/the-most-important-allies-to-make-at-work"><span><span>who work outside of your team</span></span></a>, then follow them on social media, schedule phone calls or attend events with them. If you aren't doing this at all, start by doing it once a year. Or you can increase the interaction frequency to quarterly, monthly or even weekly depending on your needs and goals. The effort is small, but the benefits are enormous.</span></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText"><span><span>Alleviating your feelings of being unhappy at work does not have to be a difficult, expensive or time-consuming process. Start with a big-picture plan, layer in learning and lean into your community. That will put you on your way to increased professional satisfaction.</span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/parent-news" hreflang="en">Parent News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 22 May 2019 22:06:12 +0000 Anonymous 4791 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu What To Do When You Don’t Know What To Do https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/what-do-when-you-dont-know-what-do <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">What To Do When You Don’t Know What To Do</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">April 15, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/uc-davis-career-events.jpg?h=242cd5c8&amp;itok=qMpi5Olg" width="1280" height="720" alt="Two people sitting at a table, looking as though they&#039;re lost in thought." typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="By Ken Barnes This article is part of our Career Corner series for members of our Parent and Family Association. Your student has been in school for a while now –– long enough to go through their first, second and sometimes third round of midterms, as well as their first-ever college finals. They may have realized a few things: Chemistry is a lot harder than before Calculus is a lot harder than before Physics is a lot harder than before Becoming a doctor (or engineer, physicist, chemist, etc.) may not be in their future Your student may have serious questions about their future, and this is a great time to help them figure out sound ways of developing meaningful answers and finding clarity. One excellent resource to steer them toward is AMS 95: Careers and Identity in American Culture. This course will be offered during the spring and will include career self-assessments, as well as tools to help students kick-start their career planning. They will not only take some of the best assessments on the market, they will also learn the fundamentals of making a resume, interviewing and learning about different careers. Other activities you can encourage them to do: Using breaks to conduct informational interviews (https://icc.ucdavis.edu/find/resources/networking/informational-interviews.htm) Take a career self-assessment through Student Health and Counseling Services (the Strong Interest Inventory is highly recommended) (https://shcs.ucdavis.edu/topics/career-assessments.html) Investigate career options through the Occupational Outlook Handbook put out by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (http://www.bls.gov/ooh/) Participate in Student Alumni Association activities that connect current students to alumni in related/interested areas (http://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/membership/students/programs)  Regardless of the situation your students find themselves in, take the opportunity to have a meaningful dialogue with them about their future, career choices and finding out what will make them happy. Point them to resources that will give them insight into the vast amount of options they have available. Places to send them at UC Davis include: The Internship and Career Center (https://icc.ucdavis.edu/) The Office of Educational Opportunity and Enrichment Services (https://opportunity.ucdavis.edu/) The One Aggie Network (http://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/) Student Health and Counseling Services (https://shcs.ucdavis.edu/) "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Your student may have serious questions about their future, and this is a great time to help them figure out sound ways of developing meaningful answers. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="MsoNoSpacing"><em><span><span><span>By Ken Barnes</span></span></span></em></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><strong><span><em>This article is part of our Career Corner series for members of our <a href="https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/membership/parentsandfamilies">Parent and Family Association</a>.</em></span></strong></span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><span>Your student has been in school for a while now –– long enough to go through their first, second and sometimes third round of midterms, as well as their first-ever college finals. They may have realized a few things:</span></span></span></p> <ul class="list--arrow"><li><span><span><span>Chemistry is a lot harder than before</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Calculus is a lot harder than before</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Physics is a lot harder than before</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Becoming a doctor (or engineer, physicist, chemist, etc.) may not be in their future </span></span></span></li> </ul><p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><span>Your student may have serious questions about their future, and this is a great time to help them figure out sound ways of developing meaningful answers and finding clarity. One excellent resource to steer them toward is <em>AMS 95: Careers and Identity in American Culture</em>. This course will be offered during the spring and will include career self-assessments, as well as tools to help students kick-start their career planning. They will not only take some of the best assessments on the market, they will also learn the fundamentals of making a resume, interviewing and learning about different careers.</span></span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><span>Other activities you can encourage them to do:</span></span></span></p> <ul class="list--arrow"><li><span><span><span>Using breaks to conduct <span><span><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/find/resources/networking/informational-interviews.htm">informational interviews</a></span></span> (<span><span><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/find/resources/networking/informational-interviews.htm">https://icc.ucdavis.edu/find/resources/networking/informational-interviews.htm</a></span></span>)</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Take a <span><span><a href="https://shcs.ucdavis.edu/topics/career-assessments.html">career self-assessment</a></span></span> through Student Health and Counseling Services (the Strong Interest Inventory is highly recommended) (<span><span><a href="https://shcs.ucdavis.edu/topics/career-assessments.html">https://shcs.ucdavis.edu/topics/career-assessments.html</a></span></span>) </span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Investigate career options through the <span><span><a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/">Occupational Outlook Handbook</a></span></span> put out by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (<span><span><a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/">http://www.bls.gov/ooh/</a></span></span>) </span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Participate in <span><span><a href="http://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/membership/students/programs">Student Alumni Association activities</a></span></span> that connect current students to alumni in related/interested areas (<span><span><a href="http://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/membership/students/programs">http://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/membership/students/programs</a></span></span>)  </span></span></span></li> </ul><p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><span>Regardless of the situation your students find themselves in, take the opportunity to have a meaningful dialogue with them about their future, career choices and finding out what will make them happy. Point them to resources that will give them insight into the vast amount of options they have available. Places to send them at UC Davis include:</span></span></span></p> <ul class="list--arrow"><li><span><span><span>The <span><span><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/">Internship and Career Center</a></span></span> (<span><span><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/">https://icc.ucdavis.edu/</a></span></span>) </span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>The <span><span><a href="https://opportunity.ucdavis.edu/">Office of Educational Opportunity and Enrichment Services</a></span></span> (<span><span><a href="https://opportunity.ucdavis.edu/">https://opportunity.ucdavis.edu/</a></span></span>) </span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>The <span><span><a href="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/">One Aggie Network</a></span></span> (<span><span><a href="http://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/">http://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/</a></span></span>) </span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://shcs.ucdavis.edu/">Student Health and Counseling Services</a></span></span></span><span> (<span><span><a href="https://shcs.ucdavis.edu/">https://shcs.ucdavis.edu/</a></span></span>) </span></span></span></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/parent-news" hreflang="en">Parent News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 15 Apr 2019 16:12:38 +0000 Anonymous 4531 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Career Corner: The Importance of Employer Info Sessions https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/employer-info-sessions <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Career Corner: The Importance of Employer Info Sessions</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">February 11, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/uc-davis-careers.jpg?h=242cd5c8&amp;itok=kYmoin8l" width="1280" height="720" alt="Group of people sitting at long table" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="By Ken Barnes Why are employer info sessions crucial to the job search? First, let’s start with what an info session is. Employer information sessions are 1 -2 hour lectures, presentations, or talks given by representatives and recruiters. They offer insight into companies, position requirements, culture and more. Benefits to your student for attending info sessions include: Learning more about employers of interest Networking and developing professional contacts Learning about internships, co-ops and job opportunities Learning about company structure, fit and potential Food is often served, and swag is often given away Obtaining interviews directly from company reps Employers generally offer info sessions under two circumstances: after career fairs to capitalize on campus visits (often because travel is involved) and during the year to attract students. If a company has offered an info session after a career fair, your student should strongly consider going –– even if they didn’t sign up for an interview. Career fairs can be hectic, and your student may only have a few minutes to talk to reps. Info sessions give significantly more insight and are unofficially considered a requirement for interviews. Many representatives also hold interview spots for those who attend, so attending can be a quick an easy way of getting past the first step of the hiring process and getting the interview. Attending an info session also shows an employer that a student has a strong interest in that company, and is a chance to gain additional information they may not get before the interview. Also, when your student interacts with the employer they are actually being interviewed, and their responses may help them get hired. Any time your student talks with an employer they should consider it as an interview, and can use that info session to make a great first impression for the official interview. Tips on successful info sessions: Dress professionally—business casual or professional. Ask questions. Do research and prepare quality questions to ask during the presentation. Bring copies of your resume and business cards if you have them. Don’t be shy! Reps expect to interact with students and share their experiences and knowledge. They are more likely to remember students who show initiative and chat with them. Also, think on your feet and respond to things they say by asking meaningful, related questions. Get a good feel for the company by talking to more than one representative. After the info session, look up each rep on LinkedIn. If you build up a rapport with them, consider connecting with them. I would be remiss if I didn’t state what not to do during info sessions: Don’t grab food and walk out early. Reps may not remember you, but they’ll remember UC Davis. It may be a factor in deciding to come back. Don’t go just for swag. Talk to companies, then wait to be offered swag. Don’t go unprepared. It’s a networking event, so prepare your 30-second pitch. If you don’t have one, contact the Internship and Career Center or do research on how to prepare one. Also, practice before you go! Don’t leave early unless you absolutely have to. Remember, you are an ambassador of the university. Represent UC Davis well! To find out about upcoming info sessions, have your student log into Aggie Job Link. An RSVP is encouraged but not required. For more questions, contact the Internship and Career Center or go to our website at http://icc.ucdavis.edu. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "By Ken Barnes Why are employer info sessions crucial to the job search? First, let’s start with what an info session is. Employer information sessions are 1 -2 hour lectures, presentations, or talks given by representatives and recruiters. They offer insight into companies, position requirements, culture and more. Benefits to your student for attending info sessions include:" } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><span><span>By Ken Barnes</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><span>Why are employer info sessions crucial to the job search? First, let’s start with what an info session is. Employer information sessions are 1 -2 hour lectures, presentations, or talks given by representatives and recruiters. They offer insight into companies, position requirements, culture and more. </span></span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><span>Benefits to your student for attending info sessions include:</span></span></span></p> <ul><li><span><span><span>Learning more about employers of interest</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Networking and developing professional contacts</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Learning about internships, co-ops and job opportunities</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Learning about company structure, fit and potential</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Food is often served, and swag is often given away</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Obtaining interviews directly from company reps</span></span></span></li> </ul><p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><span>Employers generally offer info sessions under two circumstances: after career fairs to capitalize on campus visits (often because travel is involved) and during the year to attract students. If a company has offered an info session after a career fair, your student should strongly consider going –– even if they didn’t sign up for an interview. Career fairs can be hectic, and your student may only have a few minutes to talk to reps. Info sessions give significantly more insight and are unofficially considered a requirement for interviews. Many representatives also hold interview spots for those who attend, so attending can be a quick an easy way of getting past the first step of the hiring process and getting the interview.</span></span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><span>Attending an info session also shows an employer that a student has a strong interest in that company, and is a chance to gain additional information they may not get before the interview. Also, when your student interacts with the employer they are actually being interviewed, and their responses may help them get hired. Any time your student talks with an employer they should consider it as an interview, and can use that info session to make a great first impression for the official interview.</span></span></span></p> <h5><span><span><span>Tips on successful info sessions:</span></span></span></h5> <ul><li><span><span><span>Dress professionally—business casual or professional. </span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Ask questions. Do research and prepare quality questions to ask during the presentation.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Bring copies of your resume and business cards if you have them.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Don’t be shy! Reps expect to interact with students and share their experiences and knowledge. They are more likely to remember students who show initiative and chat with them. Also, think on your feet and respond to things they say by asking meaningful, related questions.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Get a good feel for the company by talking to more than one representative.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>After the info session, look up each rep on LinkedIn. If you build up a rapport with them, consider connecting with them.</span></span></span></li> </ul><h5><span><span><span>I would be remiss if I didn’t state what not to do during info sessions:</span></span></span></h5> <ul><li><span><span><span>Don’t grab food and walk out early. Reps may not remember you, but they’ll remember UC Davis. It may be a factor in deciding to come back.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Don’t go just for swag. Talk to companies, then wait to be offered swag.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Don’t go unprepared. It’s a networking event, so prepare your 30-second pitch. If you don’t have one, contact the Internship and Career Center or do research on how to prepare one. Also, practice before you go!</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Don’t leave early unless you absolutely have to. Remember, you are an ambassador of the university. Represent UC Davis well!</span></span></span></li> </ul><p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><span>To find out about upcoming info sessions, have your student log into <span><span><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/find/resources/ajl">Aggie Job Link</a></span></span>. An RSVP is encouraged but not required. For more questions, contact the Internship and Career Center or go to our website at <span><span><a href="http://icc.ucdavis.edu">http://icc.ucdavis.edu</a></span></span>. </span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/parent-news" hreflang="en">Parent News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/parent" hreflang="en">Parent</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/student-alumni-association" hreflang="en">Student Alumni Association</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 11 Feb 2019 19:14:33 +0000 Anonymous 4321 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Career Corner: Careers in Data https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/data-careers <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Career Corner: Careers in Data</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">January 09, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/uc-davis-data-careers.jpg?h=060060ec&amp;itok=mondf19i" width="1280" height="720" alt="UC Davis students sitting in a classroom in front of computers" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Robin Reshwan, as seen on US News Data. Many of us may think “data” is just a line item on our cell phone bill where we are penalized if we used too much that month. In the business world, data is on the mind of every CEO. How to acquire customer data? How to use data to determine buying patterns? How to keep confidential data safe? These questions have resulted in a wave of new(er) career paths – and our workforce does not have enough qualified employees to match the hiring. Here are two paths to consider if you want to participate in these fast growing professions. Marketing Analytics Marketing departments are huge consumers of data and technology. A prediction by Garter (a leading research firm) estimated that the heads of marketing will actually spend more on information technology than the Chief Information Officers. Businesses of every kind want to know more about their customers and want to create practices that make it easier to target the right customers at the best time in an effort to increase sales efficiently. Most entry level marketing careers begin by learning the technology tools available to capture customer preferences, identify buying patterns and market goods/services. Proficiency with the software tools leads you to where data and ideas converge. Initiatives measured by analytics drive most marketing efforts in mid to large firms. Things like “click through rates” and determining the “return on investment” for specific marketing campaigns or strategies give executives information about what is actually working (and what is not a good use of time). If you are pursuing a career in marketing, be prepared to demonstrate more than just good ideas - as a matter of fact, your ideas may not even be needed for many years to come. Instead, show how you have increased followers, expanded online communities, grew user engagement and ultimately had an impact on revenue because of your analysis of data. Let the numbers show your marketing potential. Data Science Ever wanted to be a treasure hunter? Maybe you have a knack for solving puzzles, finding “glitches” or seeing the piece that is out of place? Good news – you might be a natural data scientist. “Since it&#039;s not a one-dimensional discipline, data scientists can emerge from just about any field. A good data scientist is someone who has the right tools (math, programming, critical thinking), is self-sufficient (doesn&#039;t need someone else to implement his or her ideas) and has an interest in understanding the context in which the skills can be applied. This is what the marketplace seeks.” (http://www.informationweek.com/big-data/big-data-analytics/data-scientist-the-sexiest-job-no-one- has/d/d-id/1112832) But why pursue a data driven role versus a more traditional math or programming role? Eric Haller, executive vice president and global head of Experian Data Labs, gives this explanation: “Data Science offers continuous exploration. It is a multidisciplinary career path. You look for things that others may not have seen – patterns to tell a story. Furthermore, the stronger your skills, you can tackle more complex and intriguing problems – marketing, fraud, credit risk.” A safe way to explore the career path while a student or a new Computer Science or Mathematics graduate, advises Haller, is to try out some online courses in data hygiene, data management, data infrastructure, analytics, statistics and machine learning. If the online learning piques your interest, then you can pursue an advanced degree in data science. A career may start as a data engineer, tasked with cleaning up data sets. Over time, and possibly with an even more advanced degree, you can move to a data scientist role where you tackle business and security problems more comprehensively using your technical and analytical skills. If you are pursuing career growth in the field, Haller suggests that you be prepared to demonstrate your math, programming and data management skills in interviewing situations and actively network to learn more about the companies and industries best suited for your interests. Also, there are considerably more opportunities in certain regions of the United States - Seattle, San Francisco Bay Area, Boston, New York, Austin, Charlotte/Raleigh and San Diego. The highest concentration of roles is near the technology and financial centers. Relocation may be necessary for career progression. “I keep saying that the sexy job in the next 10 years will to be statisticians, and I’m not kidding,” said Hal Varian, the chief economist at Google in 2009. Move over programmers and software engineers. Analysts, engineers and scientists who can manipulate huge amounts of data and emerge with powerful insights that impact strategic decisions are now the ideal professions for career minded high achievers. With its rapid rate of growth and unparalleled employment potential, the future is bright for those who pursue big data.” "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Robin Reshwan, as seen on US News Data. Many of us may think “data” is just a line item on our cell phone bill where we are penalized if we used too much that month. In the business world, data is on the mind of every CEO. How to acquire customer data? How to use data to determine buying patterns? How to keep confidential data safe?" } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><span><span>Robin Reshwan, as seen on <em>US News</em></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Data. Many of us may think “data” is just a line item on our cell phone bill where we are penalized if we used too much that month. In the business world, data is on the mind of every CEO. How to acquire customer data? How to use data to determine buying patterns? How to keep confidential data safe?</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>These questions have resulted in a wave of new(er) career paths – and our workforce does not have enough qualified employees to match the hiring. Here are two paths to consider if you want to participate in these fast growing professions.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h5><span><span><span><span><span><strong>Marketing Analytics </strong></span></span></span></span></span></h5> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Marketing departments are huge consumers of data and technology. A prediction by Garter (a leading research firm) estimated that the heads of marketing will actually spend more on information technology than the Chief Information Officers. Businesses of every kind want to know more about their customers and want to create practices that make it easier to target the right customers at the best time in an effort to increase sales efficiently.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Most entry level marketing careers begin by learning the technology tools available to capture customer preferences, identify buying patterns and market goods/services. Proficiency with the software tools leads you to where data and ideas converge. Initiatives measured by analytics drive most marketing efforts in mid to large firms. Things like “click through rates” and determining the “return on investment” for specific marketing campaigns or strategies give executives information about what is actually working (and what is not a good use of time). If you are pursuing a career in marketing, be prepared to demonstrate more than just good ideas - as a matter of fact, your ideas may not even be needed for many years to come. Instead, show how you have increased followers, expanded online communities, grew user engagement and ultimately had an impact on revenue because of your analysis of data. Let the numbers show your marketing potential.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h5><span><span><span><span><span><strong>Data Science </strong></span></span></span></span></span></h5> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Ever wanted to be a treasure hunter? Maybe you have a knack for solving puzzles, finding “glitches” or seeing the piece that is out of place? Good news – you might be a natural data scientist. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>“Since it's not a one-dimensional discipline, data scientists can emerge from just about any field. A good data scientist is someone who has the right tools (math, programming, critical thinking), is self-sufficient (doesn't need someone else to implement his or her ideas) and has an interest in understanding the <em>context </em>in which the skills can be applied. This is what the marketplace seeks.” (<span><a href="http://www.informationweek.com/big-data/big-data-analytics/data-scientist-the-sexiest-job-no-one-has/d/d-id/1112832"><span>http://www.informationweek.com/big-data/big-data-analytics/data-scientist-the-sexiest-job-no-one-</span></a></span><span> <a href="http://www.informationweek.com/big-data/big-data-analytics/data-scientist-the-sexiest-job-no-one-has/d/d-id/1112832"><span>has/d/d-id/1112832</span></a></span><span>)</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>But why pursue a data driven role versus a more traditional math or programming role? Eric Haller, executive vice president and global head of Experian Data Labs, gives this explanation: “Data Science offers continuous exploration. It is a multidisciplinary career path. You look for things that others may not have seen – patterns to tell a story. Furthermore, the stronger your skills, you can tackle more complex and intriguing problems – marketing, fraud, credit risk.”</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>A safe way to explore the career path while a student or a new Computer Science or Mathematics graduate, advises Haller, is to try out some online courses in data hygiene, data management, data infrastructure, analytics, statistics and machine learning. If the online learning piques your interest, then</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>you can pursue an advanced degree in data science. A career may start as a data engineer, tasked with cleaning up data sets. Over time, and possibly with an even more advanced degree, you can move to a data scientist role where you tackle business and security problems more comprehensively using your technical and analytical skills.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>If you are pursuing career growth in the field, Haller suggests that you be prepared to demonstrate your math, programming and data management skills in interviewing situations and actively network to learn more about the companies and industries best suited for your interests. Also, there are considerably more opportunities in certain regions of the United States - Seattle, San Francisco Bay Area, Boston, New York, Austin, Charlotte/Raleigh and San Diego. The highest concentration of roles is near the technology and financial centers. Relocation may be necessary for career progression.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>“I keep saying that the sexy job in the next 10 years will to be statisticians, and I’m not kidding,” said Hal Varian, the chief economist at Google in 2009. Move over programmers and software engineers. Analysts, engineers and scientists who can manipulate huge amounts of data and emerge with powerful insights that impact strategic decisions are now the ideal professions for career minded high achievers. With its rapid rate of growth and unparalleled employment potential, the future is bright for those who pursue big data.”</span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/parent-news" hreflang="en">Parent News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/parent" hreflang="en">Parent</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 09 Jan 2019 21:28:37 +0000 Anonymous 4216 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu