Career Articles https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/ Career Articles for One Aggie Network en Jobs for Those Whose Careers Are on Hold Because of Coronavirus https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/jobs-those-whose-careers-are-hold-because-coronavirus <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Jobs for Those Whose Careers Are on Hold Because of Coronavirus</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">April 20, 2020</span> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Workers of temporarily closed businesses can look for employment – and income – in these fields. By Robin Reshwan Jobs for Workers Halted by Coronavirus THE REACTION TO THE coronavirus, or COVID-19, has left many employees either with less or no work or nervous about the finances needed to manage through the upcoming weeks or months while our nation copes with a pandemic. If you are facing job reduction or elimination due to safety concerns related to the coronavirus, look to identify and secure a role that meets your qualifications and availability. Here are some employment fields where you can make extra cash right now. Delivery/Fulfillment Amazon announced its intent to hire 100,000 new temporary driving, fulfillment and distribution professionals throughout the U.S. to support the surge in delivery demands. They even pledged to increase their average hourly wage by $2 per hour. To find out if there are roles available near you, go here, and also look at local online job boards and community announcements to get current updates on regional hiring. While Amazon is a clear leader in delivery and fulfillment opportunities, they are not alone in their hiring needs. Businesses of all sizes are exploring or promoting delivery services as a means to stay afloat during closures in support of social distancing. Start with your local grocery stores, pet supply stores, drugstores, convenience stores and restaurants to see if they are adding to their delivery and curbside drive-up services. In addition to drivers, they may need temporary help with unloading shipments of supplies, restocking shelves, manning busy phone lines, maintaining cleanliness of stores, technology support or recording new products and sales in their databases and billing systems. Support for Those Who Provide Essential Services or Are Working Remotely Health care workers and others who provide essential services, like groceries, emergency services, pharmacy work and banking are working more hours than ever. In addition to being very busy, many may have lost their child care options as schools and day cares close. If you are healthy and able to provide child care, there are thousands of families that require in-home help. Additionally, these employees may be required to work extra hours – so providing grocery shopping, cleaning, yard work and other at-home support would enable them to manage the increased work demands. Even people who are working their regular jobs from home likely need a hand with domestic duties. You can ask around, look online and even check with temporary care service companies like Care.com to identify opportunities. Security Services Many companies hire security guards to keep stores and offices safe from looting or break-ins during a shutdown. Additionally, grocery stores and hospitals may use increased security to keep things calm during times of panic or to manage crowds. You can check with local businesses directly to ask what company they use to hire contract security guards. You can also look online for companies that provide security guard services. Health Care/Health Operations During times of crisis, physical and mental wellness are paramount. There are obvious needs for health care professionals and others who support health care operations, but there is also demand for virtual service providers. Virtual mental wellness companies offer a range of options to support people during stressful and uncertain times. Also, there are telemedicine companies that support online health care options. While you cannot become a doctor, nurse or therapist overnight, you may be able to provide administrative, operational or customer support temporarily for locally based companies that are experiencing a surge in demand right now. Online Job Boards Most online job boards can be sorted to display the roles recently posted. As an example, a search of LinkedIn&#039;s new jobs posted in the last 24 hours that are contract or temporary show close to 9,000 new roles nationally. Some titles include copywriter, seasonal product investigations, assistant/coordinator, benefits enrollments, sales and data entry. In general, these roles will likely support daily operation of essential services&#039; (food, bank, health care, veterinary, medicine) increased demands arising out of the pandemic or remote work. As always, when you seek out employment, it is critical to be professional, flexible and demonstrate that you are a good hire. Start by asking your network if they know of any opportunities. Next, prepare a resume or an outline of your work history and skills to facilitate the screening and hiring process. Also, secure at least two to three references who can speak to your honesty, work ethic and commitment. Finally, it is always OK to be politely persistent. Many of the decision-makers for these roles will be very busy, so diplomatically following up and responding quickly will go a long way toward securing a role.     "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Workers of temporarily closed businesses can look for employment – and income – in these fields. By Robin Reshwan Jobs for Workers Halted by Coronavirus" } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span>Workers of temporarily closed businesses can look for employment – and income – in these fields. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong><span>By Robin Reshwan </span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Jobs for Workers Halted by Coronavirus</span></span></span></p> <p><br /><span><span><span><strong>THE REACTION TO THE </strong>coronavirus, or COVID-19, has left many employees either with less or no work or nervous about the finances needed to manage through the upcoming weeks or months while our nation copes with a pandemic. If you are facing job reduction or elimination due to safety concerns related to the coronavirus, look to identify and secure a role that meets your qualifications and availability. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Here are some employment fields where you can make extra cash right now. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong><span>Delivery/Fulfillment </span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Amazon announced its intent to hire 100,000 new temporary driving, fulfillment and distribution professionals throughout the U.S. to support the surge in delivery demands. They even pledged to increase their average hourly wage by $2 per hour. To find out if there are roles available near you, go here, and also look at local online job boards and community announcements to get current updates on regional hiring. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>While Amazon is a clear leader in delivery and fulfillment opportunities, they are not alone in their hiring needs. Businesses of all sizes are exploring or promoting delivery services as a means to stay afloat during closures in support of social distancing. Start with your local grocery stores, pet supply stores, drugstores, convenience stores and restaurants to see if they are adding to their delivery and curbside drive-up services. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>In addition to drivers, they may need temporary help with unloading shipments of supplies, restocking shelves, manning busy phone lines, maintaining cleanliness of stores, technology support or recording new products and sales in their databases and billing systems. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong><span>Support for Those Who Provide Essential Services or Are Working Remotely </span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Health care workers and others who provide essential services, like groceries, </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>emergency services, pharmacy work and banking are working more hours than ever. In addition to being very busy, many may have lost their child care options as schools and day cares close. If you are healthy and able to provide child care, there are thousands of families that require in-home help. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Additionally, these employees may be required to work extra hours – so providing grocery shopping, cleaning, yard work and other at-home support would enable them to manage the increased work demands. Even people who are working their regular jobs from home likely need a hand with domestic duties. You can ask around, look online and even check with temporary care service companies like Care.com to identify opportunities. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong><span>Security Services </span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Many companies hire security guards to keep stores and offices safe from looting or break-ins during a shutdown. Additionally, grocery stores and hospitals may use increased security to keep things calm during times of panic or to manage crowds. You can check with local businesses directly to ask what company they use to hire contract security guards. You can also look online for companies that provide security guard services. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong><span>Health Care/Health Operations </span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>During times of crisis, physical and mental wellness are paramount. There are obvious needs for health care professionals and others who support health care operations, but there is also demand for virtual service providers. Virtual mental wellness companies offer a range of options to support people during stressful and uncertain times. Also, there are telemedicine companies that support online health care options. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>While you cannot become a doctor, nurse or therapist overnight, you may be able to provide administrative, operational or customer support temporarily for locally based companies that are experiencing a surge in demand right now. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong><span>Online Job Boards </span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Most online job boards can be sorted to display the roles recently posted. As an example, a search of LinkedIn's new jobs posted in the last 24 hours that are contract or temporary show close to 9,000 new roles nationally. Some titles include copywriter, seasonal product investigations, assistant/coordinator, benefits enrollments, sales and data entry. In general, these roles will likely support daily operation of essential services' (food, bank, health care, veterinary, medicine) increased demands arising out of the pandemic or remote work. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>As always, when you seek out employment, it is critical to be professional, flexible and demonstrate that you are a good hire. Start by asking your network if they know of any opportunities. Next, prepare a resume or an outline of your work history and skills to facilitate the screening and hiring process. Also, secure at least two to three references who can speak to your honesty, work ethic and commitment. Finally, it is always OK to be politely persistent. Many of the decision-makers for these roles will be very busy, so diplomatically following up and responding quickly will go a long way toward securing a role.</span></span></span></p> <p class="m-4971588356824052635gmail-m-2753670924745346998"><span><span><em> </em></span></span></p> <p><span><span> </span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/parent-news" hreflang="en">Parent News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/parent" hreflang="en">Parent</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 20 Apr 2020 21:52:00 +0000 Anonymous 6631 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Best Skills to List on Your Resume (and Some Skills to Exclude) https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/best-skills-list-your-resume-and-some-skills-exclude <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Best Skills to List on Your Resume (and Some Skills to Exclude) </span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/18786" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ermross</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">February 20, 2020</span> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Reflecting in-demand qualifications on your resume is key. By Robin Reshwan THE AVERAGE AMERICAN will change jobs around 10 times in their adult life. The hard truth of a modern career is that all of us will need to showcase our capabilities 20 to 40 times to secure those 10 roles. The first step of almost every interview process is to submit a resume. With so much riding on that first impression, reflecting targeted skills in your resume is key. Here are some in-demand skills and abilities to include on your resume. Impact. An effective resume shows – not tells – how you add value. Yes, you need to list your responsibilities, but you also need to show what happened because you were there. In other words, call out your impact. For example, if you are responsible for recruiting and hiring (and you would say it is one of your key strengths), include how many people you hired, how quickly you made those hires and how many of your hires have outlasted the average tenure of your firm or your industry. Collaboration. Every job description asks for &quot;cross-functional collaboration.&quot; Translation: You play well in the sandbox with other people who aren&#039;t your immediate co-workers. To illustrate your collegial approach, describe &quot;enterprise-wide taskforces you were invited to join.&quot; Or, communicate how &quot;your team was able to move through financial planning and analysis&#039;s approval process two times faster than other managers because of your track record of quality work.&quot; In short, show what was accomplished when you partnered across the company. Deadline-driven. In a competitive, technology-infused environment, even results with a 24-hour turnaround can seem 25 hours past due. The most productive employees get stuff done fast and have tactics for setting and exceeding deadline-driven expectations. Give evidence of your ability to work under pressure. Ability to thrive in chaotic environments. When speed is king, many organizations act before all options are assessed. Employees who can survive and even thrive in cultures where priorities shift, variables change and goals are sometimes moving targets are in greater demand than those looking for stable and fixed roles. Most growing companies are in flux and they want employees who can function without a fully developed structure. Analysis and insights. No role or industry is untouched by data and analysis. If you are a doctor, you have stats about patients seen in a day or satisfaction ratings. Delivery driver? You have tracking regarding your route time, deliveries made and lost or damaged packages. Know the quantifiable metrics for your profession and address what those indicators show about you. Things to Not Include on Your Resume Your home address. It is not needed at the time of application and it can have some privacy or discrimination risks. Titles to contact information. For example, instead of &quot;Phone: 555-123-4567&quot; you can just list the number &quot;555-123-4567.&quot; It will be recognized for what it is. Don&#039;t list how many years of experience you have in your summary. First, job posts never ask for &quot;two decades of managerial experience&quot; – so writing that as the lead in your summary earns you no points for applicant tracking systems or with the recruiter. And second, a reader can add up your years of experience (or make a pretty good guess) – so why give up your most valuable resume &quot;real estate&quot; to words that add no value to your candidacy? Subjective or adjective-heavy soft skills. For example: &quot;People person.&quot; &quot;Meticulous attention to detail.&quot; &quot;Team player.&quot; Recruiters and hiring authorities see hundreds of resumes. Subjective descriptions do not add any value. Hiring professionals have seen or met enough &quot;detail-oriented&quot; people who leave periods off sentences and forget to check spelling to not blindly believe you are the one who really is detailed. If you cannot demonstrate or validate that you have a soft skill, it doesn&#039;t help your candidacy. Employers often receive more than 200 resumes for job openings. Now that staff turnover is at an all-time high, discerning hiring managers look for candidates who can walk in with the skills to do the job today. Make sure your resume reflects the skills and qualifications most in-demand for the role you are targeting. A customized, well-written resume is a critical component of a successful modern job search. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Reflecting in-demand qualifications on your resume is key. By Robin Reshwan " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="Default"><span><span><span><span>Reflecting in-demand qualifications on your resume is key. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>By Robin Reshwan </span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>THE AVERAGE AMERICAN </span></strong><span>will change jobs around 10 times in their adult life. The hard truth of a modern career is that all of us will need to showcase our capabilities 20 to 40 times to secure those 10 roles. The first step of almost every interview process is to submit a resume. With so much riding on that first impression, reflecting targeted skills in your resume is key. Here are some in-demand skills and abilities to include on your resume. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Impact. </span></strong><span>An effective resume shows – not tells – how you add value. Yes, you need to list your responsibilities, but you also need to show what happened because you were there. In other words, call out your impact. For example, if you are responsible for recruiting and hiring (and you would say it is one of your key strengths), include how many people you hired, how quickly you made those hires and how many of your hires have outlasted the average tenure of your firm or your industry. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Collaboration. </span></strong><span>Every job description asks for "cross-functional collaboration." Translation: You play well in the sandbox with other people who aren't your immediate co-workers. To illustrate your collegial approach, describe "enterprise-wide taskforces you were invited to join." Or, communicate how "your team was able to move through financial planning and analysis's approval process two times faster than other managers because of your track record of quality work." In short, show what was accomplished when you partnered across the company. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Deadline-driven. </span></strong><span>In a competitive, technology-infused environment, even results with a 24-hour turnaround can seem 25 hours past due. The most productive employees get stuff done fast and have tactics for setting and exceeding deadline-driven expectations. Give evidence of your ability to work under pressure. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Ability to thrive in chaotic environments. </span></strong><span>When speed is king, many organizations act before all options are assessed. Employees who can survive and even thrive in cultures where priorities shift, variables change and goals are sometimes moving targets are in greater demand than those looking for stable and fixed roles. Most growing companies are in flux and they want employees who can function without a fully developed structure. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Analysis and insights. </span></strong><span>No role or industry is untouched by data and analysis. If you are a doctor, you have stats about patients seen in a day or satisfaction ratings. Delivery driver? You have tracking regarding your route time, deliveries made and lost or damaged packages. Know the quantifiable metrics for your profession and address what those indicators show about you. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Things to Not Include on Your Resume </span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Your home address. </span></strong><span>It is not needed at the time of application and it can have some privacy or discrimination risks. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Titles to contact information. </span></strong><span>For example, instead of "Phone: 555-123-4567" you can just list the number "555-123-4567." It will be recognized for what it is. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Don't list how many years of experience you have in your summary. </span></strong><span>First, job posts never ask for "two decades of managerial experience" – so writing that as the lead in your summary earns you no points for applicant tracking systems or with the recruiter. And second, a reader can add up your years of experience (or make a pretty good guess) – so why give up your most valuable resume "real estate" to words that add no value to your candidacy? </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Subjective or adjective-heavy soft skills. </span></strong><span>For example: "People person." "Meticulous attention to detail." "Team player." Recruiters and hiring authorities see hundreds of resumes. Subjective descriptions do not add any value. Hiring professionals have seen or met enough "detail-oriented" people who leave periods off sentences and forget to check spelling to not blindly believe you are the one who really is detailed. If you cannot demonstrate or validate that you have a soft skill, it doesn't help your candidacy. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="CxSpFirst"><span><span><span>Employers often receive more than 200 resumes for job openings. Now that staff turnover is at an all-time high, discerning hiring managers look for candidates who can walk in with the skills to do the job today. Make sure your resume reflects the skills and qualifications most in-demand for the role you are targeting. A customized, well-written resume is a critical component of a successful modern job search.</span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/parent" hreflang="en">Parent</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 20 Feb 2020 19:57:17 +0000 ermross 6476 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Generation Z Characteristics in the Workplace https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/generation-z-characteristics-workplace <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Generation Z Characteristics in the Workplace</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/18786" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ermross</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">December 10, 2019</span> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Current managers and bosses would be wise to learn what makes Gen Zers tick at work By Robin Reshwan, Contributor LIVE CHILLING AT WORK? Maybe not yet, but with approximately 80 million teens to young adults heading to the American workforce over the next decade, this may become a familiar work expression for leaving video chat apps open with friends or colleagues. Generation Z is a term used to describe people born between roughly 1996 and 2010. Not to be confused with their older, employed millennial colleagues, Gen Zers are either just entering the workforce or still in school. Here are four characteristics to look for in Gen Z interns, entry-level workers and future co-workers. Multitasking Masters &quot;Switching between different tasks and paying simultaneous attention to a wide range of stimuli comes naturally to them,&quot; notes entrepreneur and Forbes Leadership writer Deep Patel. A lifetime of fast moving and constantly updating media and technology has strengthened this generation&#039;s ability to transition rapidly and effectively. With a documented average attention span of eight seconds, the younger generation can absorb new information quickly and feels at ease with dynamic change. This is a huge advantage in modern business, where variables are many and staying in front of industry trends is a competitive advantage. Committed to Intellectual Growth Although many have yet to finish school, Gen Z is on track to be the most highly educated generation yet, according to Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. They are growing up and launching careers in an era where knowledge, both tactical &quot;how to&#039;s&quot; and explanations of more academic subjects, can be accessed quickly and cheaply online. Sites like Khan Academy, Udemy and LinkedIn Learning enable real time learning for personal and professional benefit. Additionally, schools and colleges now offer a range of online courses, certifications and degrees. Early indicators show that the desire and ability to learn, unlearn and relearn will be a core competency of this generation. A recent survey from Instructure and Harris Poll showed that 55% of Gen Zers seek out new job skills on their own, without expecting help or guidance from their company or boss. With the emphasis on learning as a competency, it is important for managers of Gen Z employees to foster intellectually stimulating environments. Encouraging ongoing training and creating active mentoring programs can be cost-effective ways to engage these new-to-career professionals. Tentative About Tacit Knowledge &quot;Tacit knowledge, or specific information about process or customers (along with other subtleties such as culture), is usually passed down within organizations through decades of in-person collaboration and communication and is critical for long-term success and leadership development.&quot; In Deloitte Insights&#039; &quot;Generation Z Enters the Workforce,&quot; the authors give weight to the gap between the information gained online and deeper concepts like context that come from relationships, observation and interaction. Gen Z employees and companies alike should be careful not to equate complex technical proficiency with knowledge of the more subtle nuances and judgment required to make business decisions independently. Internships and entry-level roles should clearly delineate technical requirements as well as &quot;experience appropriate&quot; challenges and decisions. A Gen Z employee may be an expert at getting 1,000 people to attend a business networking event, but that does not mean she knows what to do once they arrive. Diverse The definition of diversity has expanded rapidly during the last 10 years. In a recent Deloitte study on Generation Z versus millennials, &quot;Generation Z put nearly as much emphasis on the importance of diversity of gender, age, disability and education, but they put more emphasis on diversity relating to LGBT identity and religion than their elders.&quot; As executives and hiring managers actively strive to attract a wider range of backgrounds and viewpoints, Gen Z employees will seek out and embrace diversity. Their comfort with diversity will have a positive impact on inclusivity and productivity among different teams and environments. Generation Z already represents $44 billion in annual purchasing power, with 85% learning about new products via social media. These digital natives are not only target customers of many growing companies, but they offer a range of modern skills to strengthen the workforce. Internal apprenticeship programs, latticed career plans and matching skills to projects will allow for better success in staffing and development. Employers who create dynamic opportunities to leverage Gen Z&#039;s robust technical skills and fluency combined with ample opportunities for professional growth will be set up to thrive in the years to come. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Current managers and bosses would be wise to learn what makes Gen Zers tick at work " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h2><span><span><span><strong><span>Current managers and bosses would be wise to learn what makes Gen Zers tick at work</span></strong></span></span></span></h2> <p class="xdefault"><em><span><span><span><span>By Robin Reshwan, Contributor</span></span></span></span></em></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><strong><span>LIVE CHILLING AT WORK? </span></strong><span>Maybe not yet, but with approximately 80 million teens to young adults heading to the American workforce over the next decade, this may become a familiar work expression for leaving video chat apps open with friends or colleagues. Generation Z is a term used to describe people born between roughly 1996 and 2010. Not to be confused with their older, employed millennial colleagues, Gen Zers are either just entering the workforce or still in school. Here are four characteristics to look for in Gen Z interns, entry-level workers and future co-workers. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><strong><span>Multitasking Masters </span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><span>"Switching between different tasks and paying simultaneous attention to a wide range of stimuli comes naturally to them," notes entrepreneur and Forbes Leadership writer Deep Patel. A lifetime of fast moving and constantly updating media and technology has strengthened this generation's ability to transition rapidly and effectively. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><span>With a documented average attention span of eight seconds, the younger generation can absorb new information quickly and feels at ease with dynamic change. This is a huge advantage in modern business, where variables are many and staying in front of industry trends is a competitive advantage. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><strong><span>Committed to Intellectual Growth </span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><span>Although many have yet to finish school, Gen Z is on track to be the most highly educated generation yet, according to Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. They are growing up and launching careers in an era where knowledge, both tactical "how to's" and explanations of more academic subjects, can be accessed quickly and cheaply online. Sites like Khan Academy, Udemy and LinkedIn Learning enable real time learning for personal and professional benefit. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><span>Additionally, schools and colleges now offer a range of online courses, certifications and degrees. Early indicators show that the desire and ability to learn, unlearn and relearn will be a core competency of this generation. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><span>A recent survey from Instructure and Harris Poll showed that 55% of Gen Zers seek out new job skills on their own, without expecting help or guidance from their company or boss. With the emphasis on learning as a competency, it is important for managers of Gen Z employees to foster intellectually stimulating environments. Encouraging ongoing training and creating active mentoring programs can be cost-effective ways to engage these new-to-career professionals. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><strong><span>Tentative About Tacit Knowledge</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><span>"Tacit knowledge, or specific information about process or customers (along with other subtleties such as culture), is usually passed down within organizations through decades of in-person collaboration and communication and is critical for long-term success and leadership development." In Deloitte Insights' "Generation Z Enters the Workforce," the authors give weight to the gap between the information gained online and deeper concepts like context that come from relationships, observation and interaction. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><span>Gen Z employees and companies alike should be careful not to equate complex technical proficiency with knowledge of the more subtle nuances and judgment required to make business decisions independently. Internships and entry-level roles should clearly delineate technical requirements as well as "experience appropriate" challenges and decisions. A Gen Z employee may be an expert at getting 1,000 people to attend a business networking event, but that does not mean she knows what to do once they arrive. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><strong><span>Diverse </span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><span>The definition of diversity has expanded rapidly during the last 10 years. In a recent Deloitte study on Generation Z versus millennials, "Generation Z put nearly as much emphasis on the importance of diversity of gender, age, disability and education, but they put more emphasis on diversity relating to LGBT identity and religion than their elders." As executives and hiring managers actively strive to attract a wider range of backgrounds and viewpoints, Gen Z employees will seek out and embrace diversity. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><span>Their comfort with diversity will have a positive impact on inclusivity and productivity among different teams and environments. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="x"><span><span><span><span>Generation Z already represents $44 billion in annual purchasing power, with 85% learning about new products via social media. These digital natives are not only target customers of many growing companies, but they offer a range of modern skills to strengthen the workforce. Internal apprenticeship programs, latticed career plans and matching skills to projects will allow for better success in staffing and development. Employers who create dynamic opportunities to leverage Gen Z's robust technical skills and fluency combined with ample opportunities for professional growth will be set up to thrive in the years to come.</span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/parent-news" hreflang="en">Parent News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/parent" hreflang="en">Parent</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:58:00 +0000 ermross 6201 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Resource: UC Alumni Career Network https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/resource-uc-alumni-career-network <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Resource: UC Alumni Career Network</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/15861" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">bmwbro</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">November 20, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/Alumni%20Career%20Network%20Word.png?h=cad69a20&amp;itok=obBUsPIR" width="1280" height="720" alt="Alumni Career Network written" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Expand your knowledge and reach with the University of California’s Alumni Career Network. This amazing resource provides high-impact, online webinar series designed to provide UC alumni with insights, information, and connections to launch, grow and expand your career opportunities. Topics have ranged from Navigating the Job Search to Discovering a Meaningful 2nd Act Career. Each month the Alumni Career Network will tackle a different career topic and provide tips and insights to help you make the most of your UC Network. Take the opportunity to review the ever growing library of content and subscribe to stay up to date on all the latest topics. Want more or want to give back? Jump in and get involved by participating in an event or volunteering as a panelist, moderator, or speaker for our webinar career series. The webinars and content is volunteer driven and is made possible by UC alumni! "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Expand your knowledge and reach with the University of California’s Alumni Career Network. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span>Expand your knowledge and reach with the University of California’s <a href="https://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/support-uc/connect/alumni-career-network">Alumni Career Network</a>. This amazing resource provides high-impact, online webinar series designed to provide UC alumni with insights, information, and connections to launch, grow and expand your career opportunities. Topics have ranged from Navigating the Job Search to Discovering a Meaningful 2nd Act Career. Each month the <a href="https://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/support-uc/connect/alumni-career-network">Alumni Career Network</a> will tackle a different career topic and provide tips and insights to help you make the most of your UC Network.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Take the opportunity to review the ever growing library of content and <a href="https://universityofcalifornia.us12.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=9280abae5db38ffc80930a230&amp;id=2447d7f1bd">subscribe</a> to stay up to date on all the latest topics. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Want more or want to give back? Jump in and get involved by participating in an event or <a href="http://sgiz.mobi/s3/UC-Virtual-Career-Series-Interest-Form">volunteering as a panelist, moderator, or speaker</a> for our webinar career series. The webinars and content is volunteer driven and is made possible by UC alumni!</span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/alumni-stories" hreflang="en">Alumni News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 20 Nov 2019 20:42:45 +0000 bmwbro 5896 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Establishing a Professional Network https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/establishing-professional-network <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Establishing a Professional Network</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 04, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/people-shaking-hands-uc-davis.jpg?h=242cd5c8&amp;itok=1OT5Byx7" width="1280" height="720" alt="People shaking hands" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Networking is the process of cultivating relationships to obtain or provide information, resources and/or support.  Building and maintaining a professional network is essential to success in today’s job market. Establishing relationships through network connections can serve you well in determining your next job, career path and future. Here at the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association, we are here to help connect you to the extensive Aggie network across the globe. Whether you’re searching for your first job or an established professional, networking can assist with your career aspirations. Where do I start? Almost anyone can be a networking contact. Start by thinking about all of the people you may already know: family, friends, friends of friends, neighbors, former roommates, fellow alumni, professional associations, fellow job seekers, mentors, club associates, doctors, dentists, lawyers, accountants, insurance agents, real estate agents, bankers and all past associates. Networking is a lifelong investment in becoming a successful professional. Whatever direction your career takes, building and nurturing relationships will be essential. Invest time and energy in the people component of your career. Tips for Networking: Be fully present in your conversation and listen more than you talk. Think long term; not just what you think you want in the short term. Give more than you get, but do not over commit yourself. If you do commit to something, take action immediately. Be honest Only go to networking events that excite you Connect with a regional or special interest alumni network (hyperlink) Networking Guides How to introduce yourself How to network online "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Here at the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association, we are here to help connect you to the extensive Aggie network across the globe. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><span><span>Networking is the process of cultivating relationships to obtain or provide information, resources and/or support.  Building and maintaining a professional network is essential to success in today’s job market.</span></span> <span><span>Establishing relationships through network connections can serve you well in determining your next job, career path and future. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Here at the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association, we are here to help connect you to the extensive Aggie network across the globe. Whether you’re searching for your first job or an established professional, networking can assist with your career aspirations.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Where do I start?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Almost anyone can be a networking contact. Start by thinking about all of the people you may already know: family, friends, friends of friends, neighbors, former roommates, fellow alumni, professional associations, fellow job seekers, mentors, club associates, doctors, dentists, lawyers, accountants, insurance agents, real estate agents, bankers and all past associates.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Networking is a lifelong investment in becoming a successful professional. Whatever direction your career takes, building and nurturing relationships will be essential. Invest time and energy in the people component of your career.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Tips for Networking:</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <ul class="list--arrow"><li><span><span><span><span><span>Be fully present in your conversation and listen more than you talk.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Think long term; not just what you think you want in the short term.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Give more than you get, but do not over commit yourself. If you do commit to something, take action immediately.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Be honest</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Only go to networking events that excite you</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Connect with a regional or special interest alumni network (hyperlink)</span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul><h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Networking Guides</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <ul class="list--arrow"><li><span><span><span><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/sites/g/files/dgvnsk2236/files/find/resources/networking/Networking-Pitch-Handout.pdf"><span><span>How to introduce yourself </span></span></a></span></span></span></li> <li><a href="http:// https://icc.ucdavis.edu/find/resources/networking/networking-online"><span><span><span>How to network online</span></span></span></a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/alumni-stories" hreflang="en">Alumni News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 04 Sep 2019 18:27:07 +0000 Anonymous 5296 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Acing the Job Interview https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/acing-job-interview <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Acing the Job Interview</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 03, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/20171016_studentcenter_007.jpg?h=242cd5c8&amp;itok=LWsVLZ4P" width="1280" height="720" alt="People talking to each other across a table" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Interviewing can be a stressful experience –– but it doesn’t have to be. With the right preparation tools, interviewing can be an insightful way to discover what job is right for you, whatever stage you are at in your career. These resources from the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association will prepare you for even the toughest interview questions. Whether you’re a seasoned professional or someone looking for your first career job, these materials below will help you land your first job, change career paths or get that promotion. Interviewing The interview is one of the most important phases of the job search process. It is your opportunity to convince an employer that you are the right person for the job. The goal of interviewing Communicate information about yourself, your experience, your skills and your abilities as they relate to the position Seek further information about the job and the organization Evaluate the match between your needs and what the job offers How to answer interview questions Think through possible questions that the interviewer might ask and practice your answers. Click here for samples of questions you can use to prep for an interview: Before your interview, research the company, job description and your industry. Incorporate your findings into your responses to questions in the interview, showing your experience in relation to the job, company, and industry. Use these tips from the Internship and Career Center to prepare. Show your experience through examples of previous work and project experience. Your goal is to show the employer how hiring you will tackle their obstacles. Questions to ask in an interview Have questions prepared for the end of the interview. Ask questions related to the position and company like: What are the top successes and challenges that previous employees have had in this role? What does a typical day look like in this role? Do not ask questions about salary or benefits. These questions should be saved for when an offer is made. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "These resources from the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association will prepare you for even the toughest interview questions. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><span><span>Interviewing can be a stressful experience –– but it doesn’t have to be. With the right preparation tools, interviewing can be an insightful way to discover what job is right for you, whatever stage you are at in your career.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>These resources from the </span></span><span><span><span><span>UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association </span></span></span></span><span><span>will prepare you for even the toughest interview questions. Whether you’re a seasoned professional or someone looking for your first career job, these materials below will help you land your first job, change career paths or get that promotion.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Interviewing</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span>The interview is one of the most important phases of the job search process. It is your opportunity to convince an employer that you are the right person for the job.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>The goal of interviewing</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span>Communicate information about yourself, your experience, your skills and your abilities as they relate to the position</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Seek further information about the job and the organization</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Evaluate the match between your needs and what the job offers</span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul><h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>How to answer interview questions</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Think through possible questions that the interviewer might ask and practice your answers. <strong><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/interview/questions">Click here for samples of questions</a></strong> you can use to prep for an interview:</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Before your interview, research the company, job description and your industry. Incorporate your findings into your responses to questions in the interview, showing your experience in relation to the job, company, and industry. <strong><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/interview/prepare">Use these tips</a></strong> from the Internship and Career Center to prepare.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Show your experience through examples of previous work and project experience. Your goal is to show the employer how hiring you will tackle their obstacles.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Questions to ask in an interview</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Have questions prepared for the end of the interview. Ask questions related to the position and company like:</span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul class="list--arrow"><li><span><span><span><span><span>What are the top successes and challenges that previous employees have had in this role?</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>What does a typical day look like in this role?</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Do not ask questions about salary or benefits. These questions should be saved for when an offer is made.</span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/alumni-stories" hreflang="en">Alumni News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 03 Sep 2019 22:29:52 +0000 Anonymous 5286 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Find the Right Job https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/find-right-job <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Find the Right Job</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 03, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/20171205_VSC_11.jpg?h=6f3285a6&amp;itok=-CSJKq8j" width="1280" height="720" alt="Two people looking at a piece of paper" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Achieving your career goals should include organizing a job search campaign, consisting of a combination of strategies -- from networking to job boards. Searching for a new job can be a daunting prospect for anyone. Securing the right position takes hard work, research, persistence and good instincts. Fortunately, the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association can assist you in your job search. And don’t forget to use that extensive Aggie network to help connect you to jobs in your field. Tips for the job search Assess your interests, abilities, and values. Then, align your job search with them. Establish your career path and goals. Then, use your goals to focus your job search. Update your resume and cover letter.  Research the companies and industries that interest you. Assess your online brand. Check your social media privacy settings and ensure your content is professional. Consider conducting information interviews and attend career fairs to learn about employers. Conduct targeted job searches on job boards and industry association websites. Keep records of all materials, job descriptions and interactions in relation to your job search. Use these materials to prepare for the interview.  For more ideas and resources check out the UC Davis Internship and Career Center’s job search resources. Check out Handshake. Avoid job phishing. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "These resources from the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association will prepare you for even the toughest interview questions. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><span><span>Achieving your career goals should include organizing a job search campaign, consisting of a combination of strategies -- from networking to job boards. Searching for a new job can be a daunting prospect for anyone. Securing the right position takes hard work, research, persistence and good instincts.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Fortunately, the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association can assist you in your job search. And don’t forget to use that extensive Aggie network to help connect you to jobs in your field.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Tips for the job search</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span>Assess your interests, abilities, and values. Then, align your job search with them.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Establish your career path and goals. Then, use your goals to focus your job search.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/how-stand-out-competitive-job-market">Update your resume and cover letter</a>. </span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Research the companies and industries that interest you.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Assess your online brand. Check your social media privacy settings and ensure your content is professional.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Consider conducting information interviews and attend career fairs to learn about employers.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Conduct targeted job searches on job boards and industry association websites.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Keep records of all materials, job descriptions and interactions in relation to your job search. Use these materials to prepare for the interview. </span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>For more ideas and resources check out the <a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/find">UC Davis Internship and Career Center’s job search resources</a>.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Check out <a href="https://ucdavis.joinhandshake.com/login">Handshake</a>.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/majors/blog/tips-trends/7-ways-safeguard-yourself-from-job-phishing-scams">Avoid job phishing</a>.</span></span></span></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/alumni-stories" hreflang="en">Alumni News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 03 Sep 2019 22:20:40 +0000 Anonymous 5281 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Professional Development Tips for Alumni https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/professional-development-tips-alumni <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Professional Development Tips for Alumni</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 03, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/20199212-design-hall-6062.jpg?h=242cd5c8&amp;itok=VtU7vdYg" width="1280" height="720" alt="A person presenting to a gropu" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Never Stop Learning “Lifelong learner” is a popularized term, but it is the correct approach to your career. Understanding your strengths and how to apply them, as well as knowing where you can improve is vital to career growth. Regardless of where you are in your career journey, it is never too late to learn new skills or update existing ones. The UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association is here to help. Below are some tips and tricks to get the most out of professional development courses. Professional development comes in all shapes and sizes. Start by reading articles in your industry or finding articles on how to improve your soft skills at work. Periodically, perform a career evaluation of your career plan. If you don’t have a plan, create one. Think about what you want to accomplish, then detail the steps, skills and jobs you would need to have to get there. Click here for a guide, courtesy of UC Davis. Know Yourself Career management begins with exploring who you are, what you want, where you want to go and knowing how you can get there. As the foundation of career management, self-assessment encourages you to identify and explore your values, personality, interests and skills. The more insight gained from self-assessment, the more informed and focused your career decisions will be. Additional Career Resources Learn About Yourself Explore Your Career Take Action Set Goals How to Be Happy at Work Explore Careers in Data Make a Lasting Impression Optimize Your LinkedIn "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Regardless of where you are in your career journey, it is never too late to learn new skills or update existing ones. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h4>Never Stop Learning</h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Lifelong learner” is a popularized term, but it is the correct approach to your career. Understanding your strengths and how to apply them, as well as knowing where you can improve is vital to career growth. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Regardless of where you are in your career journey, it is never too late to learn new skills or update existing ones. The UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association is here to help. Below are some tips and tricks to get the most out of professional development courses.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Professional development comes in all shapes and sizes. Start by reading articles in your industry or finding articles on how to improve your soft skills at work.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Periodically, perform a career evaluation of your career plan. If you don’t have a plan, create one. Think about what you want to accomplish, then detail the steps, skills and jobs you would need to have to get there. <a href="https://hr.ucdavis.edu/departments/learning-dev/toolkits/career-mgmt/next-steps">Click here for a guide</a>, courtesy of UC Davis. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Know Yourself</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Career management begins with exploring who you are, what you want, where you want to go and knowing how you can get there. As the foundation of career management, self-assessment encourages you to identify and explore your values, personality, interests and skills. The more insight gained from self-assessment, the more informed and focused your career decisions will be.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><span><span>Additional Career Resources</span></span></span></span></span></h4> <ul class="list--arrow"><li><a href="https://hr.ucdavis.edu/departments/learning-dev/toolkits/career-mgmt/assess">Learn About Yourself</a></li> <li><a href="https://hr.ucdavis.edu/departments/learning-dev/toolkits/career-mgmt/career-exploration">Explore Your Career</a></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://hr.ucdavis.edu/departments/learning-dev/toolkits/career-mgmt/action">T</a></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://hr.ucdavis.edu/departments/learning-dev/toolkits/career-mgmt/action"><span><span><span><span><span>ake Action</span></span></span></span></span></a></li> <li><a href="https://hr.ucdavis.edu/departments/learning-dev/toolkits/career-mgmt/next-steps/goals">Set Goals</a></li> <li><a href="https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/how-be-happy-work">How to Be Happy at Work</a></li> <li><a href="https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/data-careers">Explore Careers in Data</a></li> <li><a href="https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/janet-elsea-how-make-lasting-impression-your-field">Make a Lasting Impression</a></li> <li><a href="https://alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/8-tips-optimizing-your-linkedin">Optimize Your LinkedIn</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/alumni-stories" hreflang="en">Alumni News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 03 Sep 2019 22:00:04 +0000 Anonymous 5276 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu How to Stand Out in a Competitive Job Market https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/how-stand-out-competitive-job-market <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">How to Stand Out in a Competitive Job Market</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 03, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/students-at-table-uc-davis.jpg?h=242cd5c8&amp;itok=KYpkWmq_" width="1280" height="720" alt="People sitting around a table looking at a computer screen" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="A UC Davis alumni guide to writing your resume and cover letter In today’s competitive market, your resume and cover letter need to be a focused, concise summary of your qualifications, customized for the specific position for which you are applying. Your resume is a critical marketing tool that presents your accomplishments, strengths and experience to prospective employers. Your cover letter explains who you are, what your qualifications are and why an employer should want to spend valuable time meeting you in person. No matter if you are looking for your first job out of college or are an experienced job seeker, the resources below – courtesy of the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association – are here to help. And don’t forget about the amazing network of fellow Aggies within your chosen industry; they can help you learn about specific keywords to use on your resume and cover letter in order to stand out to recruiters. Tips for writing a great resume or CV Curriculum Vitae (CV) or Resume, what is right for you? Click here for a great description of each option. A well-written resume highlighting your most relevant qualifications for the job will help you get selected for an interview. Above all, your resume needs to be consistent, concise and easy to read. You should tailor your resume or CV to show you are a good fit for the position. You will need to clearly understand the mission, focus, goals and objectives of the organization and job that you are applying to. Research is key. Follow these three steps for success from the UC Davis Internship and Career Center: Brainstorm and Collect Experiences/Skills Tailor and Format Submit Tips for writing a great cover letter The cover letter acts as your introduction to a prospective employer. Highlight your enthusiasm for the position and clearly explain why your previous job, internship, and/or skills are a good fit for the employer. You should always include a cover letter with your application unless specifically told not to by the employer. Include: your contact information the date a greeting  a few paragraphs highlight qualifications and examples a summary of qualifications For more do’s and don’ts of cover letter writing check out the UC Davis Internship and Career Center’s tips here. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "In today’s competitive market, an effective resume and cover letter needs to be a focused, concise summary of your qualifications, customized for the specific position for which you are applying. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h3>A UC Davis alumni guide to writing your resume and cover letter</h3> <p><span><span><span><span><span>In today’s competitive market, your resume and cover letter need to be a focused, concise summary of your qualifications, customized for the specific position for which you are applying. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><em>Your resume</em> is a critical marketing tool that presents your accomplishments, strengths and experience to prospective employers. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><em>Your cover letter</em> explains who you are, what your qualifications are and why an employer should want to spend valuable time meeting you in person.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>No matter if you are looking for your first job out of college or are an experienced job seeker, the resources below – courtesy of the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association – are here to help. And don’t forget about the amazing network of fellow Aggies within your chosen industry; they can help you learn about specific keywords to use on your resume and cover letter in order to stand out to recruiters.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Tips for writing a great resume or CV</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Curriculum Vitae (CV) or Resume, what is right for you? <a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/materials/resume/resumecv">Click here for a great description</a> of each option.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>A well-written resume highlighting your most relevant qualifications for the job will help you get selected for an interview. Above all, your resume needs to be consistent, concise and easy to read.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>You should tailor your resume or CV to show you are a good fit for the position. You will need to clearly understand the mission, focus, goals and objectives of the organization and job that you are applying to. Research is key. Follow these three steps for success from the UC Davis Internship and Career Center:</span></span></span></span></span></p> <ol><li><span><span><span><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/materials/resume/step1"><span><span>Brainstorm and Collect Experiences/Skills</span></span></a></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/materials/resume/step2"><span><span>Tailor and Format</span></span></a></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/materials/resume/step3"><span><span>Submit</span></span></a></span></span></span></li> </ol><h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Tips for writing a great cover letter</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span>The cover letter acts as your introduction to a prospective employer. Highlight your enthusiasm for the position and clearly explain why your previous job, internship, and/or skills are a good fit for the employer. You should always include a cover letter with your application unless specifically told not to by the employer.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Include:</span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul class="list--arrow"><li><span><span><span><span><span>your contact information</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>the date</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>a greeting </span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>a few paragraphs highlight qualifications and examples </span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>a summary of qualifications</span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul><p><span><span><span><span><span>For more do’s and don’ts of cover letter writing check out the <a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/materials/cover-letters">UC Davis Internship and Career Center’s tips here.</a></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/alumni-stories" hreflang="en">Alumni News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 03 Sep 2019 18:57:35 +0000 Anonymous 5271 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu What to Expect in a Second Interview https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/what-expect-second-interview <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">What to Expect in a Second Interview</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">August 23, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/interview2.png?h=d09b6c17&amp;itok=Mvp2pIBz" width="1280" height="720" alt="An illustration of four people sitting at at table with one person facing them. " typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="By Robin Reshwan  Raise your hand if you remember Shalamar&#039;s &#039;70s hit &quot;The Second Time Around.&quot; According to the lyrics, when it comes to romantic love, &quot;the second time is so much better, baby.&quot; The same can be said of job interviews, too. Modern companies should use multiple rounds of interviews in the hiring process, according to Power Moves, a book by psychologist Adam Grant, professor at the Wharton School at University of Pennsylvania. Second interviews help hiring managers discern whether job seekers are genuinely qualified instead of simply well-rehearsed. Candidates with fake or hyperbolic answers will likely have a difficult time maintaining that façade over the course of several conversations. To provide a 360-degree view of an applicant, second interview questions may differ in topic and style from those asked during first interviews. Preparing for probing second interview questions will help you understand what to expect in a second interview. Read on for tips on how to succeed when you move to round two. To prepare for second interview questions: Be yourself in the interview process. Dive deep with your answers. Communicate your value. I recently heard an exceptionally wise tip from a professional contact: &quot;Show how you can be a culture add.&quot; For years, people have advised candidates to make sure they can fit in with the company culture. But this outstanding candidate threw down the gauntlet by showing how the culture would be even better if he joined the team. In your second interview, make sure you clearly communicate how your unique skills, personality and experiences can improve the organization. In doing so, you are demonstrating your understanding of where the company is today and you are committing to add value with your unique contributions. It is not an easy order to fill, but it&#039;s a worthwhile approach to consider and a huge plus when you succeed. When it comes to interviews, a &quot;one and done&quot; approach simply doesn&#039;t provide enough information for either party to make the best decision. But multiple meetings don&#039;t have to only serve the needs of the company. The second interview gives discerning candidates excellent opportunities to differentiate themselves and vet companies to ensure a good fit. With both parties seeking to make the most of their time together, it increases the odds of making an ideal match. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Raise your hand if you remember Shalamar&#039;s &#039;70s hit &quot;The Second Time Around.&quot; According to the lyrics, when it comes to romantic love, &quot;the second time is so much better, baby.&quot; " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h5><em>By Robin Reshwan </em></h5> <p>Raise your hand if you remember Shalamar's '70s hit "The Second Time Around." According to the lyrics, when it comes to romantic love, "the second time is so much better, baby."</p> <p>The same can be said of job interviews, too.</p> <p>Modern companies should use multiple rounds of interviews in the hiring process, according to Power Moves, a book by psychologist Adam Grant, professor at the Wharton School at University of Pennsylvania. Second interviews help hiring managers discern whether job seekers are genuinely qualified instead of simply well-rehearsed. Candidates with fake or hyperbolic answers will likely have a difficult time maintaining that façade over the course of several conversations.</p> <p>To provide a 360-degree view of an applicant, second interview questions may differ in topic and style from those asked during first interviews. Preparing for probing second interview questions will help you understand what to expect in a second interview.<br /> Read on for tips on how to succeed when you move to round two.</p> <p>To prepare for second interview questions:</p> <ul class="list--arrow"><li>Be yourself in the interview process.</li> <li>Dive deep with your answers.</li> <li>Communicate your value.</li> </ul><p>I recently heard an exceptionally wise tip from a professional contact: "Show how you can be a culture add." For years, people have advised candidates to make sure they can fit in with the company culture. But this outstanding candidate threw down the gauntlet by showing how the culture would be even better if he joined the team.</p> <p>In your second interview, make sure you clearly communicate how your unique skills, personality and experiences can improve the organization. In doing so, you are demonstrating your understanding of where the company is today and you are committing to add value with your unique contributions. It is not an easy order to fill, but it's a worthwhile approach to consider and a huge plus when you succeed.</p> <p>When it comes to interviews, a "one and done" approach simply doesn't provide enough information for either party to make the best decision. But multiple meetings don't have to only serve the needs of the company. The second interview gives discerning candidates excellent opportunities to differentiate themselves and vet companies to ensure a good fit. With both parties seeking to make the most of their time together, it increases the odds of making an ideal match.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/parent-news" hreflang="en">Parent News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 23 Aug 2019 22:46:17 +0000 Anonymous 5221 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu