Career Articles https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/ Career Articles for One Aggie Network en What to Know About Internships https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/what-know-about-internships <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">What to Know About Internships</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">October 06, 2020</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-m-primary-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><div class="media media--type-sf-image-media-type media--view-mode-primary"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/careerEvent2.jpg?h=08b866d1&amp;itok=iKhAGZjW" width="1280" height="720" alt="Line of people sitting in business attire" typeof="foaf:Image" loading="lazy" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Written by Robin Reshwan, Seen on USNews.com As “Plastics” were the future to young Benjamin Braddock in the movie “The Graduate,” internships are the future for the students and new grads of today. Hiring managers consider internships important for career success, but they are also one of the best ways to explore potential careers. This brief guide to internships will help you understand what an internship is, how to find one and how they can expand your future career prospects. What Is an Internship? An internship is “any official or formal program to provide practical experience for beginners in an occupation or profession,” according to Dictionary.com. Internships are short-term roles where an inexperienced person can acquire real world experience. They often last eight to 12 weeks – the length of a summer, a quarter or a semester – but can be shorter or longer. From the student’s or new graduate’s perspective, an internship offers paid or unpaid hands-on work, allowing them to gain new skills and to evaluate their interests, strengths and weaknesses. From an employer’s perspective, internships introduce up-and-coming talent to their company; in exchange, the employer may receive valuable contributions, a boost in employee morale and possibly convert some interns into career employees. Companies may have one or many interns. For example, a small company might have one summer intern while a large enterprise may run formal programs with hundreds of interns across departments year-round. Internship Compensation. In general, if the employer receives most of the benefit from the working relationship, the Department of Labor requires compensation for the intern. If the employer gains no or very little business benefit – in other words, the role is more altruistic and the intern gains all the benefit – the role can be unpaid. Increasingly, more college and university academic programs require an internship for school credit. If the student is getting academic credit, those intern roles can often be unpaid. How to Find an Internship? Most colleges, universities and some high schools offer access to a wide variety of internships through their career centers or online collegiate posting sites like Handshake. You can also find internships on job boards, company websites and social media platforms including LinkedIn. Internships are available in many different industries, including accounting, finance, logistics, supply chain, sales, operations, data science, creative, legal, advertising, scientific, engineering, recruiting, public service, nonprofit and more. Just about any type of business or company could build an internship opportunity. What Type of Work to Expect? Companies often look for tasks or projects that are easy to learn, safe to perform so that mistakes won&#039;t be costly and that are valuable to both the business and the intern. In general, paid internships may be more competitive and require some experience or specific academic accomplishments. Unpaid and less formal internships may have a more open approach to qualifications desired. How to Get an Internship in an Economic Slowdown? This is the million dollar question facing many college students and new grads. Historically, due to the emphasis on training, intern roles are typically in-person. With the change in work environments, employers and intern candidates alike have needed to shift gears. Many companies have not yet determined the best way to move forward, so they have held off on seeking and accepting interns. But just because a role isn’t formally posted, doesn’t mean that there are no opportunities. If you are seeking an internship, proactively reaching out to companies or potential hiring professionals is the key to success during uncertain times. If you can communicate your potential value and specific interests, you make it easier for a manager to feel comfortable working with you as a remote intern. Many managers are willing to create a project or an internship if they have a clear idea of how you can contribute and what you would like to learn about. Your clarity is key to making it easier to get hired for a remote or online role. The Future of Internships. Certainly, the market for internships has changed dramatically this year, but many professionals in companies and in higher education are committed to help students and entry level professionals get access to internships. Many industries are hard at work to reimagine the valuable hands-on experience that internships can offer. &quot;Relatively little empirical research exists on online internships, but researchers have found that pre-internship orientations, self-regulated learning, sufficient technology, and effective supervision are important for successful experiences,&quot; according to a research brief from the University of Wisconsin--Madison&#039;s Center for Research on College-Workforce Transitions. As intern candidates, hiring professionals and higher education leaders continue to work together to forge a path to meaningful work experiences in an online or remote setting, interns will gain critical problem-solving, communication and productivity skills that will serve them well for the rest of their careers. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Written by Robin Reshwan, Seen on USNews.com As “Plastics” were the future to young Benjamin Braddock in the movie “The Graduate,” internships are the future for the students and new grads of today. Hiring managers consider internships important for career success, but they are also one of the best ways to explore potential careers. This brief guide to internships will help you understand what an internship is, how to find one and how they can expand your future career prospects." } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span>Written by Robin Reshwan, Seen on USNews.com</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>As “Plastics” were the future to young Benjamin Braddock in the movie “The Graduate,” internships are the future for the students and new grads of today. Hiring managers consider internships important for career success, but they are also one of the best ways to explore potential careers. This brief guide to internships will help you understand what an internship is, how to find one and how they can expand your future career prospects.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong><span>What Is an Internship? </span></strong><span>An internship is “any official or formal program to provide practical experience for beginners in an occupation or profession,” according to Dictionary.com. Internships are short-term roles where an inexperienced person can acquire real world experience. They often last eight to 12 weeks – the length of a summer, a quarter or a semester – but can be shorter or longer.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>From the student’s or new graduate’s perspective, an internship offers paid or unpaid hands-on work, allowing them to gain new skills and to evaluate their interests, strengths and weaknesses. From an employer’s perspective, internships introduce up-and-coming talent to their company; in exchange, the employer may receive valuable contributions, a boost in employee morale and possibly convert some interns into career employees. Companies may have one or many interns. For example, a small company might have one summer intern while a large enterprise may run formal programs with hundreds of interns across departments year-round.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Internship Compensation. </span></span></span></strong><span><span><span>In general, if the employer receives most of the benefit from the working relationship, the Department of Labor requires compensation for the intern. If the employer gains no or very little business benefit – in other words, the role is more altruistic and the intern gains all the benefit – the role can be unpaid. Increasingly, more college and university academic programs require an internship for school credit. If the student is getting academic credit, those intern roles can often be unpaid.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong><span><span><span>How to Find an Internship?</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> Most colleges, universities and some high schools offer access to a wide variety of internships through their career centers or online collegiate posting sites like Handshake. You can also find internships on job boards, company websites and social media platforms including LinkedIn. Internships are available in many different industries, including accounting, finance, logistics, supply chain, sales, operations, data science, creative, legal, advertising, scientific, engineering, recruiting, public service, nonprofit and more. Just about any type of business or company could build an internship opportunity.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong><span><span><span>What Type of Work to Expect? </span></span></span></strong><span><span><span>Companies often look for tasks or projects that are easy to learn, safe to perform so that mistakes won't be costly and that are valuable to both the business and the intern. In general, paid internships may be more competitive and require some experience or specific academic accomplishments. Unpaid and less formal internships may have a more open approach to qualifications desired.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong><span><span><span>How to Get an Internship in an Economic Slowdown? </span></span></span></strong><span><span><span>This is the million dollar question facing many college students and new grads. Historically, due to the emphasis on training, intern roles are typically in-person. With the change in work environments, employers and intern candidates alike have needed to shift gears. Many companies have not yet determined the best way to move forward, so they have held off on seeking and accepting interns. But just because a role isn’t formally posted, doesn’t mean that there are no opportunities.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>If you are seeking an internship, proactively reaching out to companies or potential hiring professionals is the key to success during uncertain times. If you can communicate your potential value and specific interests, you make it easier for a manager to feel comfortable working with you as a remote intern. Many managers are willing to create a project or an internship if they have a clear idea of how you can contribute and what you would like to learn about. Your clarity is key to making it easier to get hired for a remote or online role.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong><span><span>The Future of Internships. </span></span></strong><span><span>Certainly, the market for internships has changed dramatically this year, but many professionals in companies and in higher education are committed to help students and entry level professionals get access to internships. Many industries are hard at work to reimagine the valuable hands-on experience that internships can offer.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>"Relatively little empirical research exists on online internships, but researchers have found that pre-internship orientations, self-regulated learning, sufficient technology, and effective supervision are important for successful experiences," according to a research brief from the University of Wisconsin--Madison's Center for Research on College-Workforce Transitions.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>As intern candidates, hiring professionals and higher education leaders continue to work together to forge a path to meaningful work experiences in an online or remote setting, interns will gain critical problem-solving, communication and productivity skills that will serve them well for the rest of their careers.</span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/parent-news" hreflang="en">Parent News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/parent" hreflang="en">Parent</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 06 Oct 2020 23:47:50 +0000 Anonymous 7476 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu 5 Tips for Success as an Online Learner https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/5-tips-success-online-learner <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">5 Tips for Success as an Online Learner</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">July 16, 2020</span> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Originally posted by Continuing and Professional Education on April 13, 2020 Like many of us, you may be endeavoring to use this shelter-in-place time in productive ways. Maybe you organized your home Marie Kondo style (or maybe just a closet). If you’re looking for other ways to stay productive while staying at home, then now may be the perfect time to upskill, reskill—or pivot—in your career. UC Davis Continuing and Professional Education strives to provide convenient, flexible, high-quality online courses and programs to help you achieve your professional goals…or at least give you something new to learn. If you’ve never taken an online course before, here are five tips to help prepare you for success as an online learner. 1. Online courses are “real” courses.” Watch all lectures and actively participate. As a result of the stay-at-home order, several of our courses have moved from a classroom setting to a virtual environment.  Now offered as synchronous “webinar-style” courses, these run on platforms that offer ways to “raise your hand” and they include a chat feature where you can ask questions. Even though your instructors can’t see you face-to-face like in a classroom, they still want to help make sure you understand the material and are actively engaged —to ensure your success in their class and others. Alternatively, many of our courses and certificate programs have pre-produced curriculum that students access via Canvas, our online learning management system. Through a variety of interactive tools, this platform connects you with your instructor and classmates in an academic online space. “I was concerned an online format would not allow for enough engagement,” Business Analysis student Marnie Norris said.  But she found the online learning experience to be positive and beneficial. “The classroom and videoconference software were easy to use, which helped me engage with instructors and other students during class and afterward via discussion groups and email.” 2. Practice time management and hold yourself accountable. Although online courses offer a great deal of flexibility, it’s a good idea to set deadlines and hold yourself to them. Avoid overloading yourself with work. Dedicate the necessary amount of time each day (or each week) to work on your assignments to avoid falling behind or reducing the quality of your work when facing a time crunch. Find a way to keep yourself from procrastinating and hold yourself accountable. Find a way to reward yourself that works for you, individually. 3. Create a study space and eliminate distractions. Set up a study space in your home somewhere quiet and free of distractions where you know you can dedicate several hours to work. This can be a home office, or just your desk or dining room table. Research shows that you should avoid working from your bedroom or couch. Keep the places where you work and rest separate. Although it may be tempting to put on Netflix in the background or check your social media feeds during study time, eliminating distractions will ensure you get the most out of the course material.   4. Use online courses as a networking opportunity. Canvas offers tools to connect with your classmates and get to know them. Your classmates come from a wide variety of backgrounds, experience levels and career goals, and they’re just as willing to network as you are. Getting to know your classmates can often lead to great industry connections by the completion of your course or program. &quot;The online format was great,&quot; said Project Management student Jessica Johnson, &quot;and I made connections with a few students who were going through at the same pace as me.&quot; 5. Have kids or pets? Keep them busy and entertained—away from you. Our own families can be a source of distraction when trying to learn from home, especially during this time when many of us are doing work and school at home alongside our families. While buying some new toys for your dog makes for a few hours of distraction, kids tend to be more complicated. Several publications have posted their advice for working at home with kids around and list numerous educational games, TV shows and other online resources to keep children entertained and keep their brains working—while you have peace of mind as you get work done. Jumping into online education can be a challenging new experience, but if you have the right mindset and prepare accordingly, you’ll likely find the transition easier than expected. Want more information? See our online learning resources page for FAQs, technical requirements and more information on our online learning options. This article was provided by UC Davis Continuing and Professional Education. Learn more at https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/news/5-tips-success-online-learner "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Originally posted by Continuing and Professional Education on April 13, 2020 Like many of us, you may be endeavoring to use this shelter-in-place time in productive ways. Maybe you organized your home Marie Kondo style (or maybe just a closet). If you’re looking for other ways to stay productive while staying at home, then now may be the perfect time to upskill, reskill—or pivot—in your career." } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Originally posted by Continuing and Professional Education on April 13, 2020</p> <p>Like many of us, you may be endeavoring to use this shelter-in-place time in productive ways. Maybe you organized your home Marie Kondo style (or maybe just a closet). If you’re looking for other ways to stay productive while staying at home, then now may be the perfect time to upskill, reskill—or pivot—in your career.</p> <p>UC Davis Continuing and Professional Education strives to provide convenient, flexible, high-quality online courses and programs to help you achieve your professional goals…or at least give you something new to learn. If you’ve never taken an online course before, here are five tips to help prepare you for success as an online learner.</p> <h4><strong>1. Online courses are “real” courses.” Watch all lectures and actively participate.</strong></h4> <p>As a result of the stay-at-home order, several of our courses have moved from a classroom setting to a virtual environment.  Now offered as synchronous “webinar-style” courses, these run on platforms that offer ways to “raise your hand” and they include a chat feature where you can ask questions. Even though your instructors can’t see you face-to-face like in a classroom, they still want to help make sure you understand the material and are actively engaged —to ensure your success in their class and others.</p> <p>Alternatively, many of our courses and certificate programs have pre-produced curriculum that students access via Canvas, our online learning management system. Through a variety of interactive tools, this platform connects you with your instructor and classmates in an academic online space.</p> <blockquote> <p>“I was concerned an online format would not allow for enough engagement,” Business Analysis student Marnie Norris said.  But she found the online learning experience to be positive and beneficial. “The classroom and videoconference software were easy to use, which helped me engage with instructors and other students during class and afterward via discussion groups and email.”</p> </blockquote> <h4><strong>2. Practice time management and hold yourself accountable.</strong></h4> <p>Although online courses offer a great deal of flexibility, it’s a good idea to set deadlines and hold yourself to them. Avoid overloading yourself with work. Dedicate the necessary amount of time each day (or each week) to work on your assignments to avoid falling behind or reducing the quality of your work when facing a time crunch. Find a way to keep yourself from procrastinating and hold yourself accountable. Find a way to reward yourself that works for you, individually.</p> <h4><strong>3. Create a study space and eliminate distractions.</strong></h4> <p>Set up a study space in your home somewhere quiet and free of distractions where you know you can dedicate several hours to work. This can be a home office, or just your desk or dining room table. Research shows that <a href="https://open.buffer.com/work-bed/">you should avoid working from your bedroom or couch</a>. Keep the places where you work and rest separate. Although it may be tempting to put on Netflix in the background or check your social media feeds during study time, eliminating distractions will ensure you get the most out of the course material.  </p> <h4><strong>4. Use online courses as a networking opportunity.</strong></h4> <p>Canvas offers tools to connect with your classmates and get to know them. Your classmates come from a wide variety of backgrounds, experience levels and career goals, and they’re just as willing to network as you are. Getting to know your classmates can often lead to great industry connections by the completion of your course or program.</p> <blockquote> <p>"The online format was great," said Project Management student Jessica Johnson, "and I made connections with a few students who were going through at the same pace as me."</p> </blockquote> <h5><strong>5. Have kids or pets? Keep them busy and entertained—away from you.</strong></h5> <p>Our own families can be a source of distraction when trying to learn from home, <em>especially</em> during this time when many of us are doing work and school at home alongside our families. While buying some new toys for your dog makes for a few hours of distraction, kids tend to be more complicated. Several publications have posted <a href="https://www.fastcompany.com/90478087/got-kids-try-these-tips-for-working-from-home-while-theyre-with-you">their advice for working at home with kids around</a> and list numerous educational games, TV shows and other online resources to keep children entertained <em>and</em> keep their brains working—while you have peace of mind as you get work done.</p> <p>Jumping into online education can be a challenging new experience, but if you have the right mindset and prepare accordingly, you’ll likely find the transition easier than expected.</p> <p><strong>Want more information?</strong></p> <p>See our <a href="https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/student-services/online-resources">online learning resources page</a> for FAQs, technical requirements and more information on our online learning options.</p> <p><em>This article was provided by UC Davis Continuing and Professional Education. Learn more at </em><a href="https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/news/5-tips-success-online-learner">https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/news/5-tips-success-online-learner</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 16 Jul 2020 17:32:34 +0000 Anonymous 7106 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Tips for Future-Proofing Your Career https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/tips-future-proofing-your-career <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Tips for Future-Proofing Your Career</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">July 16, 2020</span> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Originally shared by UC Davis Continuing and Professional Education on June 22, 2020 Did you catch our “Future-Proof Your Career” Webinar Series? Hosted by career counseling expert Andrea Weiss, the series covered steps for building career resilience, networking, leveraging LinkedIn effectively, virtual interviewing and developing accomplishment statements for sharing your achievements.    If you missed the series, don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. Below are tips from Andrea Weiss highlighting key takeaways. Plus, we recorded the webinars, so you can still get the help you need to navigate this difficult job market. “Being a continuous learner and being up-to-date with technology are critical” 5 Tips for Career Resilience Say “yes” to new opportunities and use them as an opportunity to grow Build skills through informal and formal training channels Expand and nurture your network Reflect on what brings meaning to your work and how you want to express that going forward Prepare by updating your resume, polishing up your LinkedIn profile, and honing your interview skills 5 Tips for Successful Networking Networking is building relationships not simply asking someone to hire you Start your networking with those in your immediate network and expand from there When networking, listen at least as much as you speak Express appreciation for those who you network with Find ways to follow-up, stay in touch and be a resource to continue the relationship 5 Tips for Acing your Virtual Interview Research the position and the organization Analyze the job announcement to determine how your skills, knowledge and experience align and develop success stories that “prove” you can do the job Set the stage and test technology prior to your interview Make a great first impression: digital handshake, smile, eyes focused on camera Follow up with a Thank You! About career counselor Andrea Weiss Andrea Weiss, MS, NCC, MCC, has over twenty years of experience in career counseling, outplacement, training and nonprofit executive search. As a National Certified Counselor and Master Career Counselor, Andrea has helped hundreds of individuals by providing personalized, confidential career counseling services to identify and pursue satisfying careers, manage successful career transitions and take advantage of new opportunities. This article was provided by UC Davis Continuing and Professional Education. Learn more at https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/news/tips-future-proofing-your-career "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Originally shared by UC Davis Continuing and Professional Education on June 22, 2020 Did you catch our “Future-Proof Your Career” Webinar Series? Hosted by career counseling expert Andrea Weiss, the series covered steps for building career resilience, networking, leveraging LinkedIn effectively, virtual interviewing and developing accomplishment statements for sharing your achievements.   " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Originally shared by UC Davis Continuing and Professional Education on June 22, 2020</p> <p>Did you catch our “Future-Proof Your Career” Webinar Series? Hosted by career counseling expert Andrea Weiss, the series covered steps for building career resilience, networking, leveraging LinkedIn effectively, virtual interviewing and developing accomplishment statements for sharing your achievements.   </p> <p>If you missed the series, don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. Below are tips from Andrea Weiss highlighting key takeaways. Plus, we recorded the webinars, so you can still get the help you need to navigate this difficult job market.</p> <blockquote> <p>“Being a continuous learner and being up-to-date with technology are critical”</p> </blockquote> <h3><strong>5 Tips for Career Resilience</strong></h3> <ol><li>Say “yes” to new opportunities and use them as an opportunity to grow</li> <li>Build skills through informal and formal training channels</li> <li>Expand and nurture your network</li> <li>Reflect on what brings meaning to your work and how you want to express that going forward</li> <li>Prepare by updating your resume, polishing up your LinkedIn profile, and honing your interview skills</li> </ol><h3><strong>5 Tips for Successful Networking</strong></h3> <ol><li>Networking is building relationships not simply asking someone to hire you</li> <li>Start your networking with those in your immediate network and expand from there</li> <li>When networking, listen at least as much as you speak</li> <li>Express appreciation for those who you network with</li> <li>Find ways to follow-up, stay in touch and be a resource to continue the relationship</li> </ol><h3><strong>5 Tips for Acing your Virtual Interview</strong></h3> <ol><li>Research the position and the organization</li> <li>Analyze the job announcement to determine how your skills, knowledge and experience align and develop success stories that “prove” you can do the job</li> <li>Set the stage and test technology prior to your interview</li> <li>Make a great first impression: digital handshake, smile, eyes focused on camera</li> <li>Follow up with a Thank You!</li> </ol><h3><strong>About career counselor Andrea Weiss</strong></h3> <p>Andrea Weiss, MS, NCC, MCC, has over twenty years of experience in career counseling, outplacement, training and nonprofit executive search. As a National Certified Counselor and Master Career Counselor, Andrea has helped hundreds of individuals by providing personalized, confidential career counseling services to identify and pursue satisfying careers, manage successful career transitions and take advantage of new opportunities.</p> <p><em>This article was provided by UC Davis Continuing and Professional Education. Learn more at <a href="https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/news/tips-future-proofing-your-career">https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/news/tips-future-proofing-your-career</a></em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 16 Jul 2020 17:22:46 +0000 Anonymous 7101 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Learning from Home https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/learning-home <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Learning from Home</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">July 16, 2020</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-m-primary-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><div class="media media--type-sf-image-media-type media--view-mode-primary"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/Woman%20Taking%20Online%20Class.jpg?h=c673cd1c&amp;itok=Vg_Q1OYV" width="1280" height="720" alt="Woman taking online class" typeof="foaf:Image" loading="lazy" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Originally shared by UC Davis Continuing and Professional Education on April 03, 2020 Four Ways to Pursue an Online Education While You Shelter in Place If you’re like millions of people in the U.S. and around the world, you’re probably sheltering in place right now, which means you’re learning how to do things like work, exercise and socialize while isolated at home. The transition was quick, and while everyone’s focus should be on staying healthy and safe, it’s also important to not forget to continue to develop your professional abilities so that your résumé and skillset stay healthy, too. Here are four options to help you stay on top of your professional game while maintaining social distance. 1. Earn an Online Certificate From accounting to winemaking, we offer a diverse range of award-winning online programs that focus on skills that employers look for. These programs consist of fully produced, original content that was designed, developed and released specifically for online consumption. And our online learning platform, Canvas, makes accessing lectures and assignments, as well as interacting with fellow students and your instructor, easy. 2. Take an Individual Class or Two If you’re not ready to commit to a full certificate program yet, then you could also take an individual class. Almost all of our 14 areas of study have some online learning options available, and—as part of our effort to adapt to the COVID-19 pandemic—many of our traditionally in-person programs, like Land Use and Natural Resources, are currently developing remote learning options to help meet our students’ learning needs while at home. 3. Explore Our No-Cost (or Low-Cost) Training on Coursera If time is at a premium or funds are tight, but you still want to learn career-relevant training, then one of our classes offered on the Coursera learning platform might be a great option. With subjects ranging from data visualization to web development, these self-paced courses give you the flexibility to learn on your schedule, while also offering in-demand skills. And, best of all, most of the individual classes are free! 4. Dip Your Toe in a Subject of Interest with a Free Online Sample Lesson Finally, if you’d just like to get a sneak peek of what one of our online lectures is like, you can watch one of eight free sample lessons we’ve made available on our website (with more on the way). It’s a great way to preview an online course, and you’ll learn something, too! So, no matter what your needs and bandwidth are for professional development, with UC Davis a quality education is only a few mouse clicks away. Free Online Information Sessions Want to learn more about a specific program we offer? Sign up for one of our online information sessions. Staff and instructors will be on-hand to talk about program curriculum, learning outcomes and answer your questions. Sign up today. This article was produced by UC Davis Continuing and Professional Education. Learn more at https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/news/learning-home "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Originally shared by UC Davis Continuing and Professional Education on April 03, 2020" } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Originally shared by UC Davis Continuing and Professional Education on April 03, 2020</p> <h3><strong>Four Ways to Pursue an Online Education While You Shelter in Place</strong></h3> <p>If you’re like millions of people in the U.S. and around the world, you’re probably sheltering in place right now, which means you’re learning how to do things like work, exercise and socialize while isolated at home. The transition was quick, and while everyone’s focus should be on staying healthy and safe, it’s also important to not forget to continue to develop your professional abilities so that your résumé and skillset stay healthy, too.</p> <p>Here are four options to help you stay on top of your professional game while maintaining social distance.</p> <p><strong>1. Earn an Online Certificate</strong></p> <p>From <a href="https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/subject-areas/accounting">accounting</a> to <a href="https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/certificate-program/winemaking-certificate-program">winemaking</a>, we offer a diverse range of award-winning <a href="https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/areas-study/online-programs">online programs</a> that focus on skills that employers look for. These programs consist of fully produced, original content that was designed, developed and released specifically for online consumption. And our online learning platform, Canvas, makes accessing lectures and assignments, as well as interacting with fellow students and your instructor, easy.</p> <p><strong>2. Take an Individual Class or Two</strong></p> <p>If you’re not ready to commit to a full certificate program yet, then you could also take an individual class. Almost all of our <a href="https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/courses-programs">14 areas of study</a> have some online learning options available, and—as part of our effort to adapt to the COVID-19 pandemic—many of our traditionally in-person programs, like <a href="https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/subject-areas/land-use-and-natural-resources">Land Use and Natural Resources</a>, are currently developing remote learning options to help meet our students’ learning needs while at home.</p> <p><strong>3. Explore Our No-Cost (or Low-Cost) Training on Coursera</strong></p> <p>If time is at a premium or funds are tight, but you still want to learn career-relevant training, then one of <a href="https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/online-programs/coursera">our classes offered on the Coursera learning platform</a> might be a great option. With subjects ranging from <a href="https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/online-programs/self-paced/data-visualization-specialization-coursera">data visualization</a> to <a href="https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/online-programs/self-paced/webdev-coursera">web development</a>, these self-paced courses give you the flexibility to learn on your schedule, while also offering in-demand skills. And, best of all, most of the individual classes are free!</p> <p><strong>4. Dip Your Toe in a Subject of Interest with a Free Online Sample Lesson</strong></p> <p>Finally, if you’d just like to get a sneak peek of what one of our online lectures is like, you can watch one of eight <a href="https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/areas-study/online-programs/preview">free sample lessons</a> we’ve made available on our website (with more on the way). It’s a great way to preview an online course, and you’ll learn something, too!</p> <p>So, no matter what your needs and bandwidth are for professional development, with UC Davis a quality education is only a few mouse clicks away.</p> <h3>Free Online Information Sessions</h3> <p>Want to learn more about a specific program we offer? Sign up for one of our online information sessions. Staff and instructors will be on-hand to talk about program curriculum, learning outcomes and answer your questions. <a href="https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/areas-study/free-information-sessions-and-webinars">Sign up today</a>.</p> <p><em>This article was produced by UC Davis Continuing and Professional Education. Learn more at <a href="https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/news/learning-home">https://cpe.ucdavis.edu/news/learning-home</a></em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 16 Jul 2020 17:15:06 +0000 Anonymous 7096 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Jobs for Those Whose Careers Are on Hold Because of Coronavirus https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/jobs-those-whose-careers-are-hold-because-coronavirus <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Jobs for Those Whose Careers Are on Hold Because of Coronavirus</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">April 20, 2020</span> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Workers of temporarily closed businesses can look for employment – and income – in these fields. By Robin Reshwan Jobs for Workers Halted by Coronavirus THE REACTION TO THE coronavirus, or COVID-19, has left many employees either with less or no work or nervous about the finances needed to manage through the upcoming weeks or months while our nation copes with a pandemic. If you are facing job reduction or elimination due to safety concerns related to the coronavirus, look to identify and secure a role that meets your qualifications and availability. Here are some employment fields where you can make extra cash right now. Delivery/Fulfillment Amazon announced its intent to hire 100,000 new temporary driving, fulfillment and distribution professionals throughout the U.S. to support the surge in delivery demands. They even pledged to increase their average hourly wage by $2 per hour. To find out if there are roles available near you, go here, and also look at local online job boards and community announcements to get current updates on regional hiring. While Amazon is a clear leader in delivery and fulfillment opportunities, they are not alone in their hiring needs. Businesses of all sizes are exploring or promoting delivery services as a means to stay afloat during closures in support of social distancing. Start with your local grocery stores, pet supply stores, drugstores, convenience stores and restaurants to see if they are adding to their delivery and curbside drive-up services. In addition to drivers, they may need temporary help with unloading shipments of supplies, restocking shelves, manning busy phone lines, maintaining cleanliness of stores, technology support or recording new products and sales in their databases and billing systems. Support for Those Who Provide Essential Services or Are Working Remotely Health care workers and others who provide essential services, like groceries, emergency services, pharmacy work and banking are working more hours than ever. In addition to being very busy, many may have lost their child care options as schools and day cares close. If you are healthy and able to provide child care, there are thousands of families that require in-home help. Additionally, these employees may be required to work extra hours – so providing grocery shopping, cleaning, yard work and other at-home support would enable them to manage the increased work demands. Even people who are working their regular jobs from home likely need a hand with domestic duties. You can ask around, look online and even check with temporary care service companies like Care.com to identify opportunities. Security Services Many companies hire security guards to keep stores and offices safe from looting or break-ins during a shutdown. Additionally, grocery stores and hospitals may use increased security to keep things calm during times of panic or to manage crowds. You can check with local businesses directly to ask what company they use to hire contract security guards. You can also look online for companies that provide security guard services. Health Care/Health Operations During times of crisis, physical and mental wellness are paramount. There are obvious needs for health care professionals and others who support health care operations, but there is also demand for virtual service providers. Virtual mental wellness companies offer a range of options to support people during stressful and uncertain times. Also, there are telemedicine companies that support online health care options. While you cannot become a doctor, nurse or therapist overnight, you may be able to provide administrative, operational or customer support temporarily for locally based companies that are experiencing a surge in demand right now. Online Job Boards Most online job boards can be sorted to display the roles recently posted. As an example, a search of LinkedIn&#039;s new jobs posted in the last 24 hours that are contract or temporary show close to 9,000 new roles nationally. Some titles include copywriter, seasonal product investigations, assistant/coordinator, benefits enrollments, sales and data entry. In general, these roles will likely support daily operation of essential services&#039; (food, bank, health care, veterinary, medicine) increased demands arising out of the pandemic or remote work. As always, when you seek out employment, it is critical to be professional, flexible and demonstrate that you are a good hire. Start by asking your network if they know of any opportunities. Next, prepare a resume or an outline of your work history and skills to facilitate the screening and hiring process. Also, secure at least two to three references who can speak to your honesty, work ethic and commitment. Finally, it is always OK to be politely persistent. Many of the decision-makers for these roles will be very busy, so diplomatically following up and responding quickly will go a long way toward securing a role.     "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Workers of temporarily closed businesses can look for employment – and income – in these fields. By Robin Reshwan Jobs for Workers Halted by Coronavirus" } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span>Workers of temporarily closed businesses can look for employment – and income – in these fields. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong><span>By Robin Reshwan </span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Jobs for Workers Halted by Coronavirus</span></span></span></p> <p><br /><span><span><span><strong>THE REACTION TO THE </strong>coronavirus, or COVID-19, has left many employees either with less or no work or nervous about the finances needed to manage through the upcoming weeks or months while our nation copes with a pandemic. If you are facing job reduction or elimination due to safety concerns related to the coronavirus, look to identify and secure a role that meets your qualifications and availability. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Here are some employment fields where you can make extra cash right now. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong><span>Delivery/Fulfillment </span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Amazon announced its intent to hire 100,000 new temporary driving, fulfillment and distribution professionals throughout the U.S. to support the surge in delivery demands. They even pledged to increase their average hourly wage by $2 per hour. To find out if there are roles available near you, go here, and also look at local online job boards and community announcements to get current updates on regional hiring. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>While Amazon is a clear leader in delivery and fulfillment opportunities, they are not alone in their hiring needs. Businesses of all sizes are exploring or promoting delivery services as a means to stay afloat during closures in support of social distancing. Start with your local grocery stores, pet supply stores, drugstores, convenience stores and restaurants to see if they are adding to their delivery and curbside drive-up services. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>In addition to drivers, they may need temporary help with unloading shipments of supplies, restocking shelves, manning busy phone lines, maintaining cleanliness of stores, technology support or recording new products and sales in their databases and billing systems. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong><span>Support for Those Who Provide Essential Services or Are Working Remotely </span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Health care workers and others who provide essential services, like groceries, </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>emergency services, pharmacy work and banking are working more hours than ever. In addition to being very busy, many may have lost their child care options as schools and day cares close. If you are healthy and able to provide child care, there are thousands of families that require in-home help. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Additionally, these employees may be required to work extra hours – so providing grocery shopping, cleaning, yard work and other at-home support would enable them to manage the increased work demands. Even people who are working their regular jobs from home likely need a hand with domestic duties. You can ask around, look online and even check with temporary care service companies like Care.com to identify opportunities. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong><span>Security Services </span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Many companies hire security guards to keep stores and offices safe from looting or break-ins during a shutdown. Additionally, grocery stores and hospitals may use increased security to keep things calm during times of panic or to manage crowds. You can check with local businesses directly to ask what company they use to hire contract security guards. You can also look online for companies that provide security guard services. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong><span>Health Care/Health Operations </span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>During times of crisis, physical and mental wellness are paramount. There are obvious needs for health care professionals and others who support health care operations, but there is also demand for virtual service providers. Virtual mental wellness companies offer a range of options to support people during stressful and uncertain times. Also, there are telemedicine companies that support online health care options. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>While you cannot become a doctor, nurse or therapist overnight, you may be able to provide administrative, operational or customer support temporarily for locally based companies that are experiencing a surge in demand right now. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><strong><span>Online Job Boards </span></strong></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Most online job boards can be sorted to display the roles recently posted. As an example, a search of LinkedIn's new jobs posted in the last 24 hours that are contract or temporary show close to 9,000 new roles nationally. Some titles include copywriter, seasonal product investigations, assistant/coordinator, benefits enrollments, sales and data entry. In general, these roles will likely support daily operation of essential services' (food, bank, health care, veterinary, medicine) increased demands arising out of the pandemic or remote work. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>As always, when you seek out employment, it is critical to be professional, flexible and demonstrate that you are a good hire. Start by asking your network if they know of any opportunities. Next, prepare a resume or an outline of your work history and skills to facilitate the screening and hiring process. Also, secure at least two to three references who can speak to your honesty, work ethic and commitment. Finally, it is always OK to be politely persistent. Many of the decision-makers for these roles will be very busy, so diplomatically following up and responding quickly will go a long way toward securing a role.</span></span></span></p> <p class="m-4971588356824052635gmail-m-2753670924745346998"><span><span><em> </em></span></span></p> <p><span><span> </span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/parent-news" hreflang="en">Parent News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/parent" hreflang="en">Parent</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 20 Apr 2020 21:52:00 +0000 Anonymous 6631 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Best Skills to List on Your Resume (and Some Skills to Exclude) https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/best-skills-list-your-resume-and-some-skills-exclude <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Best Skills to List on Your Resume (and Some Skills to Exclude) </span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">February 20, 2020</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-m-primary-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><div class="media media--type-sf-image-media-type media--view-mode-primary"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/cv-4043315_1920.png?h=32d3e6e7&amp;itok=GWlzjGZ3" width="1280" height="720" alt="a group of resumes" typeof="foaf:Image" loading="lazy" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Reflecting in-demand qualifications on your resume is key. By Robin Reshwan THE AVERAGE AMERICAN will change jobs around 10 times in their adult life. The hard truth of a modern career is that all of us will need to showcase our capabilities 20 to 40 times to secure those 10 roles. The first step of almost every interview process is to submit a resume. With so much riding on that first impression, reflecting targeted skills in your resume is key. Here are some in-demand skills and abilities to include on your resume. Impact. An effective resume shows – not tells – how you add value. Yes, you need to list your responsibilities, but you also need to show what happened because you were there. In other words, call out your impact. For example, if you are responsible for recruiting and hiring (and you would say it is one of your key strengths), include how many people you hired, how quickly you made those hires and how many of your hires have outlasted the average tenure of your firm or your industry. Collaboration. Every job description asks for &quot;cross-functional collaboration.&quot; Translation: You play well in the sandbox with other people who aren&#039;t your immediate co-workers. To illustrate your collegial approach, describe &quot;enterprise-wide taskforces you were invited to join.&quot; Or, communicate how &quot;your team was able to move through financial planning and analysis&#039;s approval process two times faster than other managers because of your track record of quality work.&quot; In short, show what was accomplished when you partnered across the company. Deadline-driven. In a competitive, technology-infused environment, even results with a 24-hour turnaround can seem 25 hours past due. The most productive employees get stuff done fast and have tactics for setting and exceeding deadline-driven expectations. Give evidence of your ability to work under pressure. Ability to thrive in chaotic environments. When speed is king, many organizations act before all options are assessed. Employees who can survive and even thrive in cultures where priorities shift, variables change and goals are sometimes moving targets are in greater demand than those looking for stable and fixed roles. Most growing companies are in flux and they want employees who can function without a fully developed structure. Analysis and insights. No role or industry is untouched by data and analysis. If you are a doctor, you have stats about patients seen in a day or satisfaction ratings. Delivery driver? You have tracking regarding your route time, deliveries made and lost or damaged packages. Know the quantifiable metrics for your profession and address what those indicators show about you. Things to Not Include on Your Resume Your home address. It is not needed at the time of application and it can have some privacy or discrimination risks. Titles to contact information. For example, instead of &quot;Phone: 555-123-4567&quot; you can just list the number &quot;555-123-4567.&quot; It will be recognized for what it is. Don&#039;t list how many years of experience you have in your summary. First, job posts never ask for &quot;two decades of managerial experience&quot; – so writing that as the lead in your summary earns you no points for applicant tracking systems or with the recruiter. And second, a reader can add up your years of experience (or make a pretty good guess) – so why give up your most valuable resume &quot;real estate&quot; to words that add no value to your candidacy? Subjective or adjective-heavy soft skills. For example: &quot;People person.&quot; &quot;Meticulous attention to detail.&quot; &quot;Team player.&quot; Recruiters and hiring authorities see hundreds of resumes. Subjective descriptions do not add any value. Hiring professionals have seen or met enough &quot;detail-oriented&quot; people who leave periods off sentences and forget to check spelling to not blindly believe you are the one who really is detailed. If you cannot demonstrate or validate that you have a soft skill, it doesn&#039;t help your candidacy. Employers often receive more than 200 resumes for job openings. Now that staff turnover is at an all-time high, discerning hiring managers look for candidates who can walk in with the skills to do the job today. Make sure your resume reflects the skills and qualifications most in-demand for the role you are targeting. A customized, well-written resume is a critical component of a successful modern job search. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Reflecting in-demand qualifications on your resume is key. By Robin Reshwan " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="Default"><span><span><span><span>Reflecting in-demand qualifications on your resume is key. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>By Robin Reshwan </span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>THE AVERAGE AMERICAN </span></strong><span>will change jobs around 10 times in their adult life. The hard truth of a modern career is that all of us will need to showcase our capabilities 20 to 40 times to secure those 10 roles. The first step of almost every interview process is to submit a resume. With so much riding on that first impression, reflecting targeted skills in your resume is key. Here are some in-demand skills and abilities to include on your resume. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Impact. </span></strong><span>An effective resume shows – not tells – how you add value. Yes, you need to list your responsibilities, but you also need to show what happened because you were there. In other words, call out your impact. For example, if you are responsible for recruiting and hiring (and you would say it is one of your key strengths), include how many people you hired, how quickly you made those hires and how many of your hires have outlasted the average tenure of your firm or your industry. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Collaboration. </span></strong><span>Every job description asks for "cross-functional collaboration." Translation: You play well in the sandbox with other people who aren't your immediate co-workers. To illustrate your collegial approach, describe "enterprise-wide taskforces you were invited to join." Or, communicate how "your team was able to move through financial planning and analysis's approval process two times faster than other managers because of your track record of quality work." In short, show what was accomplished when you partnered across the company. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Deadline-driven. </span></strong><span>In a competitive, technology-infused environment, even results with a 24-hour turnaround can seem 25 hours past due. The most productive employees get stuff done fast and have tactics for setting and exceeding deadline-driven expectations. Give evidence of your ability to work under pressure. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Ability to thrive in chaotic environments. </span></strong><span>When speed is king, many organizations act before all options are assessed. Employees who can survive and even thrive in cultures where priorities shift, variables change and goals are sometimes moving targets are in greater demand than those looking for stable and fixed roles. Most growing companies are in flux and they want employees who can function without a fully developed structure. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Analysis and insights. </span></strong><span>No role or industry is untouched by data and analysis. If you are a doctor, you have stats about patients seen in a day or satisfaction ratings. Delivery driver? You have tracking regarding your route time, deliveries made and lost or damaged packages. Know the quantifiable metrics for your profession and address what those indicators show about you. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Things to Not Include on Your Resume </span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Your home address. </span></strong><span>It is not needed at the time of application and it can have some privacy or discrimination risks. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Titles to contact information. </span></strong><span>For example, instead of "Phone: 555-123-4567" you can just list the number "555-123-4567." It will be recognized for what it is. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Don't list how many years of experience you have in your summary. </span></strong><span>First, job posts never ask for "two decades of managerial experience" – so writing that as the lead in your summary earns you no points for applicant tracking systems or with the recruiter. And second, a reader can add up your years of experience (or make a pretty good guess) – so why give up your most valuable resume "real estate" to words that add no value to your candidacy? </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Default"><span><span><span><strong><span>Subjective or adjective-heavy soft skills. </span></strong><span>For example: "People person." "Meticulous attention to detail." "Team player." Recruiters and hiring authorities see hundreds of resumes. Subjective descriptions do not add any value. Hiring professionals have seen or met enough "detail-oriented" people who leave periods off sentences and forget to check spelling to not blindly believe you are the one who really is detailed. If you cannot demonstrate or validate that you have a soft skill, it doesn't help your candidacy. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="CxSpFirst"><span><span><span>Employers often receive more than 200 resumes for job openings. Now that staff turnover is at an all-time high, discerning hiring managers look for candidates who can walk in with the skills to do the job today. Make sure your resume reflects the skills and qualifications most in-demand for the role you are targeting. A customized, well-written resume is a critical component of a successful modern job search.</span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/parent" hreflang="en">Parent</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 20 Feb 2020 19:57:17 +0000 Anonymous 6476 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Generation Z Characteristics in the Workplace https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/generation-z-characteristics-workplace <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Generation Z Characteristics in the Workplace</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/18786" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ermross</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">December 10, 2019</span> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Current managers and bosses would be wise to learn what makes Gen Zers tick at work By Robin Reshwan, Contributor LIVE CHILLING AT WORK? Maybe not yet, but with approximately 80 million teens to young adults heading to the American workforce over the next decade, this may become a familiar work expression for leaving video chat apps open with friends or colleagues. Generation Z is a term used to describe people born between roughly 1996 and 2010. Not to be confused with their older, employed millennial colleagues, Gen Zers are either just entering the workforce or still in school. Here are four characteristics to look for in Gen Z interns, entry-level workers and future co-workers. Multitasking Masters &quot;Switching between different tasks and paying simultaneous attention to a wide range of stimuli comes naturally to them,&quot; notes entrepreneur and Forbes Leadership writer Deep Patel. A lifetime of fast moving and constantly updating media and technology has strengthened this generation&#039;s ability to transition rapidly and effectively. With a documented average attention span of eight seconds, the younger generation can absorb new information quickly and feels at ease with dynamic change. This is a huge advantage in modern business, where variables are many and staying in front of industry trends is a competitive advantage. Committed to Intellectual Growth Although many have yet to finish school, Gen Z is on track to be the most highly educated generation yet, according to Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. They are growing up and launching careers in an era where knowledge, both tactical &quot;how to&#039;s&quot; and explanations of more academic subjects, can be accessed quickly and cheaply online. Sites like Khan Academy, Udemy and LinkedIn Learning enable real time learning for personal and professional benefit. Additionally, schools and colleges now offer a range of online courses, certifications and degrees. Early indicators show that the desire and ability to learn, unlearn and relearn will be a core competency of this generation. A recent survey from Instructure and Harris Poll showed that 55% of Gen Zers seek out new job skills on their own, without expecting help or guidance from their company or boss. With the emphasis on learning as a competency, it is important for managers of Gen Z employees to foster intellectually stimulating environments. Encouraging ongoing training and creating active mentoring programs can be cost-effective ways to engage these new-to-career professionals. Tentative About Tacit Knowledge &quot;Tacit knowledge, or specific information about process or customers (along with other subtleties such as culture), is usually passed down within organizations through decades of in-person collaboration and communication and is critical for long-term success and leadership development.&quot; In Deloitte Insights&#039; &quot;Generation Z Enters the Workforce,&quot; the authors give weight to the gap between the information gained online and deeper concepts like context that come from relationships, observation and interaction. Gen Z employees and companies alike should be careful not to equate complex technical proficiency with knowledge of the more subtle nuances and judgment required to make business decisions independently. Internships and entry-level roles should clearly delineate technical requirements as well as &quot;experience appropriate&quot; challenges and decisions. A Gen Z employee may be an expert at getting 1,000 people to attend a business networking event, but that does not mean she knows what to do once they arrive. Diverse The definition of diversity has expanded rapidly during the last 10 years. In a recent Deloitte study on Generation Z versus millennials, &quot;Generation Z put nearly as much emphasis on the importance of diversity of gender, age, disability and education, but they put more emphasis on diversity relating to LGBT identity and religion than their elders.&quot; As executives and hiring managers actively strive to attract a wider range of backgrounds and viewpoints, Gen Z employees will seek out and embrace diversity. Their comfort with diversity will have a positive impact on inclusivity and productivity among different teams and environments. Generation Z already represents $44 billion in annual purchasing power, with 85% learning about new products via social media. These digital natives are not only target customers of many growing companies, but they offer a range of modern skills to strengthen the workforce. Internal apprenticeship programs, latticed career plans and matching skills to projects will allow for better success in staffing and development. Employers who create dynamic opportunities to leverage Gen Z&#039;s robust technical skills and fluency combined with ample opportunities for professional growth will be set up to thrive in the years to come. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Current managers and bosses would be wise to learn what makes Gen Zers tick at work " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h2><span><span><span><strong><span>Current managers and bosses would be wise to learn what makes Gen Zers tick at work</span></strong></span></span></span></h2> <p class="xdefault"><em><span><span><span><span>By Robin Reshwan, Contributor</span></span></span></span></em></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><strong><span>LIVE CHILLING AT WORK? </span></strong><span>Maybe not yet, but with approximately 80 million teens to young adults heading to the American workforce over the next decade, this may become a familiar work expression for leaving video chat apps open with friends or colleagues. Generation Z is a term used to describe people born between roughly 1996 and 2010. Not to be confused with their older, employed millennial colleagues, Gen Zers are either just entering the workforce or still in school. Here are four characteristics to look for in Gen Z interns, entry-level workers and future co-workers. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><strong><span>Multitasking Masters </span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><span>"Switching between different tasks and paying simultaneous attention to a wide range of stimuli comes naturally to them," notes entrepreneur and Forbes Leadership writer Deep Patel. A lifetime of fast moving and constantly updating media and technology has strengthened this generation's ability to transition rapidly and effectively. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><span>With a documented average attention span of eight seconds, the younger generation can absorb new information quickly and feels at ease with dynamic change. This is a huge advantage in modern business, where variables are many and staying in front of industry trends is a competitive advantage. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><strong><span>Committed to Intellectual Growth </span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><span>Although many have yet to finish school, Gen Z is on track to be the most highly educated generation yet, according to Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. They are growing up and launching careers in an era where knowledge, both tactical "how to's" and explanations of more academic subjects, can be accessed quickly and cheaply online. Sites like Khan Academy, Udemy and LinkedIn Learning enable real time learning for personal and professional benefit. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><span>Additionally, schools and colleges now offer a range of online courses, certifications and degrees. Early indicators show that the desire and ability to learn, unlearn and relearn will be a core competency of this generation. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><span>A recent survey from Instructure and Harris Poll showed that 55% of Gen Zers seek out new job skills on their own, without expecting help or guidance from their company or boss. With the emphasis on learning as a competency, it is important for managers of Gen Z employees to foster intellectually stimulating environments. Encouraging ongoing training and creating active mentoring programs can be cost-effective ways to engage these new-to-career professionals. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><strong><span>Tentative About Tacit Knowledge</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><span>"Tacit knowledge, or specific information about process or customers (along with other subtleties such as culture), is usually passed down within organizations through decades of in-person collaboration and communication and is critical for long-term success and leadership development." In Deloitte Insights' "Generation Z Enters the Workforce," the authors give weight to the gap between the information gained online and deeper concepts like context that come from relationships, observation and interaction. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><span>Gen Z employees and companies alike should be careful not to equate complex technical proficiency with knowledge of the more subtle nuances and judgment required to make business decisions independently. Internships and entry-level roles should clearly delineate technical requirements as well as "experience appropriate" challenges and decisions. A Gen Z employee may be an expert at getting 1,000 people to attend a business networking event, but that does not mean she knows what to do once they arrive. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><strong><span>Diverse </span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><span>The definition of diversity has expanded rapidly during the last 10 years. In a recent Deloitte study on Generation Z versus millennials, "Generation Z put nearly as much emphasis on the importance of diversity of gender, age, disability and education, but they put more emphasis on diversity relating to LGBT identity and religion than their elders." As executives and hiring managers actively strive to attract a wider range of backgrounds and viewpoints, Gen Z employees will seek out and embrace diversity. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="xdefault"><span><span><span><span>Their comfort with diversity will have a positive impact on inclusivity and productivity among different teams and environments. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="x"><span><span><span><span>Generation Z already represents $44 billion in annual purchasing power, with 85% learning about new products via social media. These digital natives are not only target customers of many growing companies, but they offer a range of modern skills to strengthen the workforce. Internal apprenticeship programs, latticed career plans and matching skills to projects will allow for better success in staffing and development. Employers who create dynamic opportunities to leverage Gen Z's robust technical skills and fluency combined with ample opportunities for professional growth will be set up to thrive in the years to come.</span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/parent-news" hreflang="en">Parent News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/parent" hreflang="en">Parent</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 11 Dec 2019 00:58:00 +0000 ermross 6201 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Resource: UC Alumni Career Network https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/resource-uc-alumni-career-network <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Resource: UC Alumni Career Network</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">November 20, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-m-primary-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><div class="media media--type-sf-image-media-type media--view-mode-primary"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/Alumni%20Career%20Network%20Word.png?h=cad69a20&amp;itok=obBUsPIR" width="1280" height="720" alt="Alumni Career Network written" typeof="foaf:Image" loading="lazy" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Expand your knowledge and reach with the University of California’s Alumni Career Network. This amazing resource provides high-impact, online webinar series designed to provide UC alumni with insights, information, and connections to launch, grow and expand your career opportunities. Topics have ranged from Navigating the Job Search to Discovering a Meaningful 2nd Act Career. Each month the Alumni Career Network will tackle a different career topic and provide tips and insights to help you make the most of your UC Network. Take the opportunity to review the ever growing library of content and subscribe to stay up to date on all the latest topics. Want more or want to give back? Jump in and get involved by participating in an event or volunteering as a panelist, moderator, or speaker for our webinar career series. The webinars and content is volunteer driven and is made possible by UC alumni! "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Expand your knowledge and reach with the University of California’s Alumni Career Network. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span>Expand your knowledge and reach with the University of California’s <a href="https://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/support-uc/connect/alumni-career-network">Alumni Career Network</a>. This amazing resource provides high-impact, online webinar series designed to provide UC alumni with insights, information, and connections to launch, grow and expand your career opportunities. Topics have ranged from Navigating the Job Search to Discovering a Meaningful 2nd Act Career. Each month the <a href="https://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/support-uc/connect/alumni-career-network">Alumni Career Network</a> will tackle a different career topic and provide tips and insights to help you make the most of your UC Network.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Take the opportunity to review the ever growing library of content and <a href="https://universityofcalifornia.us12.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=9280abae5db38ffc80930a230&amp;id=2447d7f1bd">subscribe</a> to stay up to date on all the latest topics. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Want more or want to give back? Jump in and get involved by participating in an event or <a href="http://sgiz.mobi/s3/UC-Virtual-Career-Series-Interest-Form">volunteering as a panelist, moderator, or speaker</a> for our webinar career series. The webinars and content is volunteer driven and is made possible by UC alumni!</span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/alumni-stories" hreflang="en">Alumni News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 20 Nov 2019 20:42:45 +0000 Anonymous 5896 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Establishing a Professional Network https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/establishing-professional-network <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Establishing a Professional Network</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 04, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-m-primary-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><div class="media media--type-sf-image-media-type media--view-mode-primary"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/people-shaking-hands-uc-davis.jpg?h=242cd5c8&amp;itok=1OT5Byx7" width="1280" height="720" alt="People shaking hands" typeof="foaf:Image" loading="lazy" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Networking is the process of cultivating relationships to obtain or provide information, resources and/or support.  Building and maintaining a professional network is essential to success in today’s job market. Establishing relationships through network connections can serve you well in determining your next job, career path and future. Here at the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association, we are here to help connect you to the extensive Aggie network across the globe. Whether you’re searching for your first job or an established professional, networking can assist with your career aspirations. Where do I start? Almost anyone can be a networking contact. Start by thinking about all of the people you may already know: family, friends, friends of friends, neighbors, former roommates, fellow alumni, professional associations, fellow job seekers, mentors, club associates, doctors, dentists, lawyers, accountants, insurance agents, real estate agents, bankers and all past associates. Networking is a lifelong investment in becoming a successful professional. Whatever direction your career takes, building and nurturing relationships will be essential. Invest time and energy in the people component of your career. Tips for Networking: Be fully present in your conversation and listen more than you talk. Think long term; not just what you think you want in the short term. Give more than you get, but do not over commit yourself. If you do commit to something, take action immediately. Be honest Only go to networking events that excite you Connect with a regional or special interest alumni network (hyperlink) Networking Guides How to introduce yourself How to network online "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Here at the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association, we are here to help connect you to the extensive Aggie network across the globe. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><span><span>Networking is the process of cultivating relationships to obtain or provide information, resources and/or support.  Building and maintaining a professional network is essential to success in today’s job market.</span></span> <span><span>Establishing relationships through network connections can serve you well in determining your next job, career path and future. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Here at the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association, we are here to help connect you to the extensive Aggie network across the globe. Whether you’re searching for your first job or an established professional, networking can assist with your career aspirations.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Where do I start?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Almost anyone can be a networking contact. Start by thinking about all of the people you may already know: family, friends, friends of friends, neighbors, former roommates, fellow alumni, professional associations, fellow job seekers, mentors, club associates, doctors, dentists, lawyers, accountants, insurance agents, real estate agents, bankers and all past associates.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Networking is a lifelong investment in becoming a successful professional. Whatever direction your career takes, building and nurturing relationships will be essential. Invest time and energy in the people component of your career.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Tips for Networking:</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <ul class="list--arrow"><li><span><span><span><span><span>Be fully present in your conversation and listen more than you talk.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Think long term; not just what you think you want in the short term.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Give more than you get, but do not over commit yourself. If you do commit to something, take action immediately.</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Be honest</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Only go to networking events that excite you</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Connect with a regional or special interest alumni network (hyperlink)</span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul><h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Networking Guides</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <ul class="list--arrow"><li><span><span><span><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/sites/g/files/dgvnsk2236/files/find/resources/networking/Networking-Pitch-Handout.pdf"><span><span>How to introduce yourself </span></span></a></span></span></span></li> <li><a href="http:// https://icc.ucdavis.edu/find/resources/networking/networking-online"><span><span><span>How to network online</span></span></span></a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/alumni-stories" hreflang="en">Alumni News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 04 Sep 2019 18:27:07 +0000 Anonymous 5296 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu Acing the Job Interview https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/news/acing-job-interview <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Acing the Job Interview</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype=""> (not verified)</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 03, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-m-primary-media field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><div class="media media--type-sf-image-media-type media--view-mode-primary"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk451/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/20171016_studentcenter_007.jpg?h=242cd5c8&amp;itok=LWsVLZ4P" width="1280" height="720" alt="People talking to each other across a table" typeof="foaf:Image" loading="lazy" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Career Articles" addthis:description="Interviewing can be a stressful experience –– but it doesn’t have to be. With the right preparation tools, interviewing can be an insightful way to discover what job is right for you, whatever stage you are at in your career. These resources from the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association will prepare you for even the toughest interview questions. Whether you’re a seasoned professional or someone looking for your first career job, these materials below will help you land your first job, change career paths or get that promotion. Interviewing The interview is one of the most important phases of the job search process. It is your opportunity to convince an employer that you are the right person for the job. The goal of interviewing Communicate information about yourself, your experience, your skills and your abilities as they relate to the position Seek further information about the job and the organization Evaluate the match between your needs and what the job offers How to answer interview questions Think through possible questions that the interviewer might ask and practice your answers. Click here for samples of questions you can use to prep for an interview: Before your interview, research the company, job description and your industry. Incorporate your findings into your responses to questions in the interview, showing your experience in relation to the job, company, and industry. Use these tips from the Internship and Career Center to prepare. Show your experience through examples of previous work and project experience. Your goal is to show the employer how hiring you will tackle their obstacles. Questions to ask in an interview Have questions prepared for the end of the interview. Ask questions related to the position and company like: What are the top successes and challenges that previous employees have had in this role? What does a typical day look like in this role? Do not ask questions about salary or benefits. These questions should be saved for when an offer is made. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "These resources from the UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association will prepare you for even the toughest interview questions. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><span><span>Interviewing can be a stressful experience –– but it doesn’t have to be. With the right preparation tools, interviewing can be an insightful way to discover what job is right for you, whatever stage you are at in your career.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>These resources from the </span></span><span><span><span><span>UC Davis Cal Aggie Alumni Association </span></span></span></span><span><span>will prepare you for even the toughest interview questions. Whether you’re a seasoned professional or someone looking for your first career job, these materials below will help you land your first job, change career paths or get that promotion.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Interviewing</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span>The interview is one of the most important phases of the job search process. It is your opportunity to convince an employer that you are the right person for the job.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>The goal of interviewing</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span>Communicate information about yourself, your experience, your skills and your abilities as they relate to the position</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Seek further information about the job and the organization</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Evaluate the match between your needs and what the job offers</span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul><h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>How to answer interview questions</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Think through possible questions that the interviewer might ask and practice your answers. <strong><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/interview/questions">Click here for samples of questions</a></strong> you can use to prep for an interview:</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Before your interview, research the company, job description and your industry. Incorporate your findings into your responses to questions in the interview, showing your experience in relation to the job, company, and industry. <strong><a href="https://icc.ucdavis.edu/interview/prepare">Use these tips</a></strong> from the Internship and Career Center to prepare.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Show your experience through examples of previous work and project experience. Your goal is to show the employer how hiring you will tackle their obstacles.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h4><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Questions to ask in an interview</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Have questions prepared for the end of the interview. Ask questions related to the position and company like:</span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul class="list--arrow"><li><span><span><span><span><span>What are the top successes and challenges that previous employees have had in this role?</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>What does a typical day look like in this role?</span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Do not ask questions about salary or benefits. These questions should be saved for when an offer is made.</span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/alumni-stories" hreflang="en">Alumni News</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/career-resources/career-articles" hreflang="en">Career Articles</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 03 Sep 2019 22:29:52 +0000 Anonymous 5286 at https://www.alumni.ucdavis.edu